Sunday, 24 November 2002

Seafire

This might already have been discussed before I joined the group.  If so I apologise!
 
Is anyone able to remember when the Seafire, that sat in a compound between the canteen and the new armoury, was finally removed?  I seem to remember that it was there all the time I was a pupil (1948-53).  In spite of being in the RAF section of the CCF I can't remember ever being allowed to get close to it and couldn't, and still don't, understand quite why it was there.
 
I do remember the "Grasshopper" glider though. I think I "flew" it once.  The launch system was by means of bungee ropes attached to a hook on the glider - the glider being tethered to a convenient tree.  A number of cadets would walk away from the glider with the bungee and when it had stretched sufficiently the tether was released by the pilot and the glider just about became airborne.  I have an idea that there was also a triangular stand that the glider could be mounted on and if the wind was strong enough the machine would answer to the controls (after a fashion)!
 
John Rowe

Seafire

This might already have been discussed before I joined the group.  If so I apologise!
 
Is anyone able to remember when the Seafire, that sat in a compound between the canteen and the new armoury, was finally removed?  I seem to remember that it was there all the time I was a pupil (1948-53).  In spite of being in the RAF section of the CCF I can't remember ever being allowed to get close to it and couldn't, and still don't, understand quite why it was there.
 
I do remember the "Grasshopper" glider though. I think I "flew" it once.  The launch system was by means of bungee ropes attached to a hook on the glider - the glider being tethered to a convenient tree.  A number of cadets would walk away from the glider with the bungee and when it had stretched sufficiently the tether was released by the pilot and the glider just about became airborne.  I have an idea that there was also a triangular stand that the glider could be mounted on and if the wind was strong enough the machine would answer to the controls (after a fashion)!
 
John Rowe