Wednesday, 28 August 2002

Football season 65-6

Is anyone out there prepared to admit playing football against Brockenhurst, I believe in the 1965/6 season for the 2nd year team. I sometimes hope it was only a nightmare. That year the whole team, except for two (I think), were boarders and this match fell on an exeat weekend. At least 9 reserves and the other two playing out of position. I normally played right full back but started the game on the left wing.
After a hard fought match we narrowly lost 20-0. This was presumably some sort of record as Jake didn't read out the result in assembly on the Monday morning with all the others. At least England won the World Cup that year! 

Football season 65-6

Is anyone out there prepared to admit playing football against Brockenhurst, I believe in the 1965/6 season for the 2nd year team. I sometimes hope it was only a nightmare. That year the whole team, except for two (I think), were boarders and this match fell on an exeat weekend. At least 9 reserves and the other two playing out of position. I normally played right full back but started the game on the left wing.
After a hard fought match we narrowly lost 20-0. This was presumably some sort of record as Jake didn't read out the result in assembly on the Monday morning with all the others. At least England won the World Cup that year! 

Monday, 26 August 2002

Happy mid-30s.

Way back in 1934, I started at Peter Pips as a scholarship boy travelling daily by train from Eastleigh.  I remember an early welcome by Doc Freeman who ran his eye over us and said “ The cream of the brains of the Administrative County of Hampshire?   You’re more like the sediment at the bottom”.  At that time we had a school war cry to encourage our teams.  It went 

Ee nick-a-deena deena deena, Ee nick-a-deena dina doh,

Ho, Ho, Hoppity Ho, Pull up your socks the Peters.

While I was there, Doc announced that it was a version of an Australian chant and it lowered the dignity of the school, so he banned its use.

 

I have very much enjoyed reading all your messages and I was surprised by how many names I remember.  CANY was teaching Geography in the end room of the new block of classrooms to the left of the main building.   A little way back towards the main building was EO Jones’ lair where he lived with his ‘Alsatian’.  I was hopeless at Latin but his Alsatian only bit me once.  At that time his Alsatian’s bark was worse than it’s bite.  Being a two-inch square section of timber, the ‘footprint’ of its contact was several square inches and so the bite was reasonably gentle.

 

My next Latin teacher was Cooksey.   He taught me very little Latin but he REALLY taught me how to HATE !!!!!!   My surname is Br챕haut and Cooksey delighted in grabbing me by the hair and bouncing me up and down on my seat while declining my name.   BrayOH, BrayASS, Brayat, Brayamus, Brayatis, Brayant.   Printable comments fail me.  After a couple of years, I was thrown out of Latin and left to study Physics on my own, supervised by Mr St.John, pronounced Sinjon.  My science teacher was Mr Tanner and the skill of those teachers allowed me to do well in the Oxford School Certificate examination.

 

I remember a teacher who we called Wick, perhaps because he ruled Wick (or was it Wyke) Lodge.  He always wore a clerical collar and was reputed to spend much time in the bar of the ‘Jolly Farmer’.   I was taught English by EGAP.  He was Mr Page and his nickname was his real name spelt backwards.  I wonder if CANY was Mr Yates’ initials?   Paul Wodehouse was another teacher and we knew of his connection with the ‘Hampshire Chronicle’ and I think his wife may have been its editor.   I think that Mr Cozens might have taught us Maths from textbooks that he had had published.

 

Two other teachers there were real characters.  Punch taught German.   He was a short stocky man with a very broad cast in his eyes and was reputed to have been a spy in World War I.  The optical axes of his eyes seemed to meet at nearly 90 degrees, and we never did discover which of us was being observed.  He used to bring an old clockwork gramophone into the classroom and play a German song, Nach Frankreich zogen zwei Granadier by Schumann. We learned and sang this and the quality of our singing was matched only by the abysmal quality of the gramophone.   The other teacher was History teacher Dickey Childs.  He was very deaf and used his right hand for cupping his ear and for throwing the blackboard rubber.   On a scale of 1 to 10 his throwing was rated 9 for velocity but only 3 for accuracy.   The class needed good reflexes to survive.

 

Happy days !

Happy mid-30s.

Way back in 1934, I started at Peter Pips as a scholarship boy travelling daily by train from Eastleigh.  I remember an early welcome by Doc Freeman who ran his eye over us and said “ The cream of the brains of the Administrative County of Hampshire?   You’re more like the sediment at the bottom”.  At that time we had a school war cry to encourage our teams.  It went 

Ee nick-a-deena deena deena, Ee nick-a-deena dina doh,

Ho, Ho, Hoppity Ho, Pull up your socks the Peters.

While I was there, Doc announced that it was a version of an Australian chant and it lowered the dignity of the school, so he banned its use.

 

I have very much enjoyed reading all your messages and I was surprised by how many names I remember.  CANY was teaching Geography in the end room of the new block of classrooms to the left of the main building.   A little way back towards the main building was EO Jones’ lair where he lived with his ‘Alsatian’.  I was hopeless at Latin but his Alsatian only bit me once.  At that time his Alsatian’s bark was worse than it’s bite.  Being a two-inch square section of timber, the ‘footprint’ of its contact was several square inches and so the bite was reasonably gentle.

 

My next Latin teacher was Cooksey.   He taught me very little Latin but he REALLY taught me how to HATE !!!!!!   My surname is Br챕haut and Cooksey delighted in grabbing me by the hair and bouncing me up and down on my seat while declining my name.   BrayOH, BrayASS, Brayat, Brayamus, Brayatis, Brayant.   Printable comments fail me.  After a couple of years, I was thrown out of Latin and left to study Physics on my own, supervised by Mr St.John, pronounced Sinjon.  My science teacher was Mr Tanner and the skill of those teachers allowed me to do well in the Oxford School Certificate examination.

 

I remember a teacher who we called Wick, perhaps because he ruled Wick (or was it Wyke) Lodge.  He always wore a clerical collar and was reputed to spend much time in the bar of the ‘Jolly Farmer’.   I was taught English by EGAP.  He was Mr Page and his nickname was his real name spelt backwards.  I wonder if CANY was Mr Yates’ initials?   Paul Wodehouse was another teacher and we knew of his connection with the ‘Hampshire Chronicle’ and I think his wife may have been its editor.   I think that Mr Cozens might have taught us Maths from textbooks that he had had published.

 

Two other teachers there were real characters.  Punch taught German.   He was a short stocky man with a very broad cast in his eyes and was reputed to have been a spy in World War I.  The optical axes of his eyes seemed to meet at nearly 90 degrees, and we never did discover which of us was being observed.  He used to bring an old clockwork gramophone into the classroom and play a German song, Nach Frankreich zogen zwei Granadier by Schumann. We learned and sang this and the quality of our singing was matched only by the abysmal quality of the gramophone.   The other teacher was History teacher Dickey Childs.  He was very deaf and used his right hand for cupping his ear and for throwing the blackboard rubber.   On a scale of 1 to 10 his throwing was rated 9 for velocity but only 3 for accuracy.   The class needed good reflexes to survive.

 

Happy days !

Saturday, 24 August 2002

Old symondian's october dinner

hello all,
Does anyone know the date of the dinner? I see the OSA website is down at the moment,
 
best regards,
 
jim    

Old symondian's october dinner

hello all,
Does anyone know the date of the dinner? I see the OSA website is down at the moment,
 
best regards,
 
jim    

Tuesday, 20 August 2002

Hockey - what year?

Anyone want to guess the year this was written in the annual School magazine? Mike

 

SECOND XI HOCKEY

This season will perhaps be remembered longer than any other, not for the standard of hockey, but rather for the appalling winter. As a result of the latter fewer than half of the original fixtures were played, and of these only three matches were played in the Easter term. However, this was by no means an unsuccessful season. The team lost only two of the ten matches. At last, it seems that there is some pride in playing for what can be called a "Second Eleven", rather than a team of "also rans".

Dimmer kept goal throughout the season and improved as it progressed; although at one or two matches he spent most of the time admiring the surrounding countryside (there being little else for him to do). Renton, at right-back, after finding some difficulty early in the season in stopping the ball, improved steadily and became a very sound back. Biyth proved a strong quick-tackling back and he and Renton soon became a force to be reckoned with, the two of them saving many a dangerous situation. Hammond, at right-half showed himself to be a fast, hard-tackling player, but he could improve his ball distribution. Boardley (when he managed to stay on his feet) proved he was a hard-working and keen centre-half, playing his best against the stronger teams. Winsey, at left-half, completed the defence and proved a strong and boisterous player with a good sense of positioning, though, he tends to wander too far up the field at times. Palmer played at right-wing throughout the season, and had a valuable inside-forward in Tickner, a busy and enterprising player, whose speed proved a valuable asset and bemused many a defence. Buckett, at centre-forward, was consistently good, hitting the ball accurately and hard, (even with his ancient stick) and this ability earned him many fine goals. Tredray, before being called to the realms of higher service, proved the inspiration of the attack, having excellent ball control and accurate distribution. His place was then filled by McGhie, a player of great ability, with an extremely hard shot; Dark at left-wing completed the attack, and with his sudden bursts of speed, filled a difficult position with success though he should learn more ways of beating his opponents.

However, this was only the regular team, and several others played in one or two matches. Bolt played in all three of the Easter term matches, and with his fearless tackling and enthusiastic approach became a fine asset to the defence; Stephenson, at the start of the season, played hockey of high quality. The fact that, in all the years he has played school hockey, he has never been on the losing side, is an obvious guide to his ability. Hassall and Malcolmson also played, and for part of the match against the Old Boys, we even had Goater in goal.

With this improvement in school hockey, and with an Under 14 and Colts team, a constant supply of players has at last been realised; and one hopes that, with practice, School hockey will continue to improve in standard

Hockey - what year?

Anyone want to guess the year this was written in the annual School magazine? Mike

 

SECOND XI HOCKEY

This season will perhaps be remembered longer than any other, not for the standard of hockey, but rather for the appalling winter. As a result of the latter fewer than half of the original fixtures were played, and of these only three matches were played in the Easter term. However, this was by no means an unsuccessful season. The team lost only two of the ten matches. At last, it seems that there is some pride in playing for what can be called a "Second Eleven", rather than a team of "also rans".

Dimmer kept goal throughout the season and improved as it progressed; although at one or two matches he spent most of the time admiring the surrounding countryside (there being little else for him to do). Renton, at right-back, after finding some difficulty early in the season in stopping the ball, improved steadily and became a very sound back. Biyth proved a strong quick-tackling back and he and Renton soon became a force to be reckoned with, the two of them saving many a dangerous situation. Hammond, at right-half showed himself to be a fast, hard-tackling player, but he could improve his ball distribution. Boardley (when he managed to stay on his feet) proved he was a hard-working and keen centre-half, playing his best against the stronger teams. Winsey, at left-half, completed the defence and proved a strong and boisterous player with a good sense of positioning, though, he tends to wander too far up the field at times. Palmer played at right-wing throughout the season, and had a valuable inside-forward in Tickner, a busy and enterprising player, whose speed proved a valuable asset and bemused many a defence. Buckett, at centre-forward, was consistently good, hitting the ball accurately and hard, (even with his ancient stick) and this ability earned him many fine goals. Tredray, before being called to the realms of higher service, proved the inspiration of the attack, having excellent ball control and accurate distribution. His place was then filled by McGhie, a player of great ability, with an extremely hard shot; Dark at left-wing completed the attack, and with his sudden bursts of speed, filled a difficult position with success though he should learn more ways of beating his opponents.

However, this was only the regular team, and several others played in one or two matches. Bolt played in all three of the Easter term matches, and with his fearless tackling and enthusiastic approach became a fine asset to the defence; Stephenson, at the start of the season, played hockey of high quality. The fact that, in all the years he has played school hockey, he has never been on the losing side, is an obvious guide to his ability. Hassall and Malcolmson also played, and for part of the match against the Old Boys, we even had Goater in goal.

With this improvement in school hockey, and with an Under 14 and Colts team, a constant supply of players has at last been realised; and one hopes that, with practice, School hockey will continue to improve in standard

Sunday, 11 August 2002

Ernie Gladwell

One master from my era at PSS ('55-'63) whom I remember with affection was Ernie Gladwell. I learnt some German and some of that strange dialect, Scientific German, from him.
 
I distnctly remember the first words of the first lesson from him: he held up one finger and said, loudly and clearly : "Finger!" (pronounced the German way, like 'singer'). There must have been a lot more afterwards, since I seem to know more German than that, but that's the lesson that stuck in memory.
 
That and the time when I hiccupped loudly and he told me to clear out before he knocked my block off. He seemed to think there was something insincere about the hiccup.
 
Oh, and the time he recommended the novel he'd just read: "Limbo '90", by Bernard Wolfe. I got the book from the library and was amazed to find it contained sex. (I can recommend it too: it's about a post-nuclear-holocaust America in which people voluntarily replace their limbs with robotic prosthetics. You'll have trouble finding it, though: the very first link turned up by Google is headed: 'Bernard Wolfe: A Forgotten Writer'.)
 
I haven't seen much mention of 'Ernie'. Does anyone else remember him? Does anyone know if he's alive and well?
 
Chris
 
 
 
 
 

Ernie Gladwell

One master from my era at PSS ('55-'63) whom I remember with affection was Ernie Gladwell. I learnt some German and some of that strange dialect, Scientific German, from him.
 
I distnctly remember the first words of the first lesson from him: he held up one finger and said, loudly and clearly : "Finger!" (pronounced the German way, like 'singer'). There must have been a lot more afterwards, since I seem to know more German than that, but that's the lesson that stuck in memory.
 
That and the time when I hiccupped loudly and he told me to clear out before he knocked my block off. He seemed to think there was something insincere about the hiccup.
 
Oh, and the time he recommended the novel he'd just read: "Limbo '90", by Bernard Wolfe. I got the book from the library and was amazed to find it contained sex. (I can recommend it too: it's about a post-nuclear-holocaust America in which people voluntarily replace their limbs with robotic prosthetics. You'll have trouble finding it, though: the very first link turned up by Google is headed: 'Bernard Wolfe: A Forgotten Writer'.)
 
I haven't seen much mention of 'Ernie'. Does anyone else remember him? Does anyone know if he's alive and well?
 
Chris
 
 
 
 
 

La vacance

Hello, everyone
 
It's a bit quiet on the message board lately.  I dare say everyone is enjoying the holiday season.  It makes it very easy for a so-called manager like me! Feels almost like an honorary position.
 
I took a look at the PSC Website at http://www.psc.ac.uk just now. It's quite active and gives a good impression of activity at Owen's Road. There's a nice little potted history of Peter Symonds, too.
 
I see that the College is an 'Investor in People'. What does it mean?
 
And don't forget Chris Boulter's PSC email directory at http://list.psc.ac.uk/ - which lists people from both School and College eras.
 
I used to be able to get automatic notifications of additions to the directory, but I can't see any facility for setting that up now - am I missing something? Anyway,  I've set WatchThatPage to keep track of it.
 
So long for now,
 
Chris

La vacance

Hello, everyone
 
It's a bit quiet on the message board lately.  I dare say everyone is enjoying the holiday season.  It makes it very easy for a so-called manager like me! Feels almost like an honorary position.
 
I took a look at the PSC Website at http://www.psc.ac.uk just now. It's quite active and gives a good impression of activity at Owen's Road. There's a nice little potted history of Peter Symonds, too.
 
I see that the College is an 'Investor in People'. What does it mean?
 
And don't forget Chris Boulter's PSC email directory at http://list.psc.ac.uk/ - which lists people from both School and College eras.
 
I used to be able to get automatic notifications of additions to the directory, but I can't see any facility for setting that up now - am I missing something? Anyway,  I've set WatchThatPage to keep track of it.
 
So long for now,
 
Chris