Friday, 30 December 2005

The "New Buildings" pictures in Pictures, and description of the site now :)

Here's something I can actually help you out with-names of new buildings.

The one labelled "Is this Product Design?" is actually the Paul Woodhouse Centre, where we all eat and socialise :) Downstairs is the canteen, upstairs is the student common room, faculty offices and Student Services. Out the front there is picnic benches that people generally don't eat on, but instead sit on.

The photos labelled "Varley Lodge" are actually just of the Varley building. It's really long and cross shaped, it houses foreign languages, English lit and lang, economics, business studies, maths and performing arts. There is also the Varley Theatre and the Varley cafe there too. The Varley Lodge was demolished before I joined, but i remember it being there when I went on Open Evening.

On the picture "This must be the IT centre", that is again of Varley, not IT. If you can remember the layout of the site, IT is the little brown building next to the west end of Varley, and there are also some IT rooms upstairs in John Shields. The white canopy you can see in this picture is out the front of the Varley cafe, it has more picnic tables underneath it.

John Shields is the newest building, it houses law, psychology, sociology, philosophy and IT/computing A Level.

Then we also have Freeman (small brown brick building) that houses history, geography, politics and classics, Wyke Lodge (some economics, critical thinking and a lot of staff workrooms), Northbrook (library, careers library, open IT facilities), Science Centre (physics, chemistry, biology, human biology, and the lecture theatre where we have general studies lectures) and Mercers Sports Hall (Sport and PE classrooms, a gym, and a sports hall)

There's also the art studios, product design building, and textiles building which are pretty self explanatory :). There's also a small building, with a sort of white wood terrace out the front which is the photography studios.

College Centre just houses the boring stuff like resources, exams, MIS, reception and principal's offices. I think there's also a music recital room.

The two boarding houses are Falkland Lodge (far end of the site, next to the Mercers Sports Hall) and School House (next to Northbrook and John Shields at the front of the site).

Lindsay

The "New Buildings" pictures in Pictures, and description of the site now :)

Here's something I can actually help you out with-names of new buildings.

The one labelled "Is this Product Design?" is actually the Paul Woodhouse Centre, where we all eat and socialise :) Downstairs is the canteen, upstairs is the student common room, faculty offices and Student Services. Out the front there is picnic benches that people generally don't eat on, but instead sit on.

The photos labelled "Varley Lodge" are actually just of the Varley building. It's really long and cross shaped, it houses foreign languages, English lit and lang, economics, business studies, maths and performing arts. There is also the Varley Theatre and the Varley cafe there too. The Varley Lodge was demolished before I joined, but i remember it being there when I went on Open Evening.

On the picture "This must be the IT centre", that is again of Varley, not IT. If you can remember the layout of the site, IT is the little brown building next to the west end of Varley, and there are also some IT rooms upstairs in John Shields. The white canopy you can see in this picture is out the front of the Varley cafe, it has more picnic tables underneath it.

John Shields is the newest building, it houses law, psychology, sociology, philosophy and IT/computing A Level.

Then we also have Freeman (small brown brick building) that houses history, geography, politics and classics, Wyke Lodge (some economics, critical thinking and a lot of staff workrooms), Northbrook (library, careers library, open IT facilities), Science Centre (physics, chemistry, biology, human biology, and the lecture theatre where we have general studies lectures) and Mercers Sports Hall (Sport and PE classrooms, a gym, and a sports hall)

There's also the art studios, product design building, and textiles building which are pretty self explanatory :). There's also a small building, with a sort of white wood terrace out the front which is the photography studios.

College Centre just houses the boring stuff like resources, exams, MIS, reception and principal's offices. I think there's also a music recital room.

The two boarding houses are Falkland Lodge (far end of the site, next to the Mercers Sports Hall) and School House (next to Northbrook and John Shields at the front of the site).

Lindsay

Saturday, 10 December 2005

Jim's hard disk has crashed

hi Doug,
Oh woe! I tried to send an email to you individually but apparently this computer in Northampton's public library is not set up properly for that.
My hard disk has crashed, my friend who knows everything geeky will look at it tomorrow, in the meantime you're on your own!
 
 
regards,
 
jim
 

Jim's hard disk has crashed

hi Doug,
Oh woe! I tried to send an email to you individually but apparently this computer in Northampton's public library is not set up properly for that.
My hard disk has crashed, my friend who knows everything geeky will look at it tomorrow, in the meantime you're on your own!
 
 
regards,
 
jim
 

Wednesday, 23 November 2005

New member-Lindsay.

Hi, I'm Lindsay, I'm new here. I'm in Lower VI at Peter Symonds College, taking my A-Levels.
 
If anyone has any questions about the site as it is now, or what the buildings look like inside now, I'd be happy to oblige. I know most places, except from the boarding houses as I'm not a boarder.
 
I might even be able to get some photos if anyone would like :)
 
Lindsay

New member-Lindsay.

Hi, I'm Lindsay, I'm new here. I'm in Lower VI at Peter Symonds College, taking my A-Levels.
 
If anyone has any questions about the site as it is now, or what the buildings look like inside now, I'd be happy to oblige. I know most places, except from the boarding houses as I'm not a boarder.
 
I might even be able to get some photos if anyone would like :)
 
Lindsay

Saturday, 20 August 2005

"The History of Peter Symonds", Neil Jenkinson

Hi,
 
You can get information on buying the book from the Old Symondians site here.
I have got a copy Doug and could post it to you if you like.
 
regards,
 
jim  

"The History of Peter Symonds", Neil Jenkinson

Hi,
 
You can get information on buying the book from the Old Symondians site here.
I have got a copy Doug and could post it to you if you like.
 
regards,
 
jim  

Sunday, 14 August 2005

New member - Bill Harrop

Came across this website almost by accident and have just joined. This is my first attempt to get onto the notice and to see what happens if I succeed.
 
I started at the old school in 1966 or 1967, becoming a boarder at Kelso House (under Richard "Pog" Adams) together with Andrew Morris, Bill Cumming, Paul Megson. Steve Jones, Simon Adams and Nick Allerston. Any of those names out there and listening? It would be fantastic to hear from them, or indeed fom anyone who recognises my name.
 
I will keep an eye on the mesage board and start the process of learning how to get the best out of this website.
 
Regards to all.
 
Bill Harrop

New member - Bill Harrop

Came across this website almost by accident and have just joined. This is my first attempt to get onto the notice and to see what happens if I succeed.
 
I started at the old school in 1966 or 1967, becoming a boarder at Kelso House (under Richard "Pog" Adams) together with Andrew Morris, Bill Cumming, Paul Megson. Steve Jones, Simon Adams and Nick Allerston. Any of those names out there and listening? It would be fantastic to hear from them, or indeed fom anyone who recognises my name.
 
I will keep an eye on the mesage board and start the process of learning how to get the best out of this website.
 
Regards to all.
 
Bill Harrop

Thursday, 4 August 2005

Visit to the school with photographs, July 2005

I visited the school on the 29th July and took some photos of various buildings perhaps concentrating on the old ones for the sake of nostalgia. I have posted them in several albums here
There are several loose ends, my memory being what it is, please feel free to fill in the gaps.
 
regards,
 
jim  

Visit to the school with photographs, July 2005

I visited the school on the 29th July and took some photos of various buildings perhaps concentrating on the old ones for the sake of nostalgia. I have posted them in several albums here
There are several loose ends, my memory being what it is, please feel free to fill in the gaps.
 
regards,
 
jim  

Saturday, 16 July 2005

Old Symondians Society newsletter

Hi,
I received the latest edition of the OSS newsletter today and have scanned it into the Nostalgia site. You can find it on the latest news page together with a link to proposed reunion of the class of 1955.
 
best regards,
 
jim wishart  

Old Symondians Society newsletter

Hi,
I received the latest edition of the OSS newsletter today and have scanned it into the Nostalgia site. You can find it on the latest news page together with a link to proposed reunion of the class of 1955.
 
best regards,
 
jim wishart  

Thursday, 23 June 2005

Im new to winchester and Peter symonds!

Hey! I know im not an ex-pupil but im well worried about going to peter symonds because im hopefully starting in september!!

Did anyone go to the taster day? I want to know what it was like for you, especially if you didn't know ANYONE! like me!!

Please reply! xxx

Im new to winchester and Peter symonds!

Hey! I know im not an ex-pupil but im well worried about going to peter symonds because im hopefully starting in september!!

Did anyone go to the taster day? I want to know what it was like for you, especially if you didn't know ANYONE! like me!!

Please reply! xxx

Wednesday, 8 June 2005

New member, Peter Emery

I am pleased to welcome Peter Emery as a new member. Here is an email I received from him by way of introduction:-
 

My name is Peter Emery and I attended Peter Symonds 1967-72 (joined in 3rd grade – Pa Watts as form teacher), was in Northbrook House (Green). Reading the message board content of your website has brought back many memories. I would like to join your group, in part that I may browse your inventory of photos. After working overseas 1973-76 I moved to Canada where I still reside.

 

I will share some memories of my attendance at Peter Symonds. I remember most of my teachers - Pa Watts - "On the bloomin' fiddle again" (History), Tom Pierce (English), Oink Griffin - "Come along now, we have a lot of work to do today" (French), Chalky White - great dexterity with his fingers (Math), Ted Taverner - Crow (Geography), Mr. Rolfe (Stats), Tweedy Harris (Pure Maths), Kenny Redmore - "Just shut up will you there uh...." (Chemistry), Jack Woolmore (Chemistry), Pongo Cox -"Come along now laddie" - sometimes made students sit on the leg of an upturned lab stool (Biology), Mr. Faulds - with the huge snozz - to show who was boss punched a student square in the face when we were lined up waiting for our first class with him - would be serving jail time today for such an offence (Biology), RI teacher? -  once held the blazer jacket over the head of a student, but continued teaching, while he had an epileptic seizure, Mr. Hirst - "Brick" - would bounce several boys on his knee to test the strength of the stool they had made (Woodwork) - I still have my stool and book holder, Peter May - always enjoyed talking about the stock market with him - "ICI , very good dividend" (Economics), Neddie Bray (Phys Ed), Mr. Batchelor  - in the purple track suit - sometimes whacked boys on the rear end for misbehaviour (Phys Ed), Jake Ashurst - a tough, but fair Headmaster - at assembly one morning stated, "It has come to my notice that someone has written the word 'FUCK' on the lavatory door and I'll not stand for it" - I believe that we each had to pay a shilling to clean up the mess! - in 6th form if you were spotted in a pub, Jake would confront you and say "You're a man about town", Mr. Cooksey - the slippery second in command with greasy slicked back grey hair who would creep through the hallways, peer through classroom windows and gesticulate with his finger for boys to step outside and then demand his hair be cut. Other teachers who I did not take classes from were, Clanger Laing with the rumour of a Luger pistol under his gown, Hettie Hammond - "Been there", Biffer Smith, Jack Northeast, Mr. Renton. For the life of me I cannot remember my Physics teacher during those days.

 

Through my school days I was in the same class group as Roger Ault, who I sadly hear passed away last October. I would be interested in learning of the circumstances of his death. Rog was wonderful with his impersonations of all the various teachers.

 

I enjoyed my cadet days in the Army group - Signals section. I got my Marksman badge first time out at the range on the Lee Enfield 303. Back in those days we could sign out a Lee Enfield with .22 barrel insert and ammo from the Armoury near the cafeteria and perform target practice after school. I also remember mock battles with blank ammo on Farley Mount, visits to Salisbury Plain and helicopter trips, Arduous Training in the Lake District and Field Days.

 

I would be interested in perhaps returning for a class reunion one of these days. I see the class of ‘71 did something recently - I find that everyone now looks so old in their class photo, but I guess I have also been the wrong side of 50 for several years now!

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2005 4:30 AM
Subject: new member

Hi Peter,
We are very pleased to welcome you to the list. Please add a message introducing yourself. It would be much appreciated,
best regards,
jim

New member, Peter Emery

I am pleased to welcome Peter Emery as a new member. Here is an email I received from him by way of introduction:-
 

My name is Peter Emery and I attended Peter Symonds 1967-72 (joined in 3rd grade – Pa Watts as form teacher), was in Northbrook House (Green). Reading the message board content of your website has brought back many memories. I would like to join your group, in part that I may browse your inventory of photos. After working overseas 1973-76 I moved to Canada where I still reside.

 

I will share some memories of my attendance at Peter Symonds. I remember most of my teachers - Pa Watts - "On the bloomin' fiddle again" (History), Tom Pierce (English), Oink Griffin - "Come along now, we have a lot of work to do today" (French), Chalky White - great dexterity with his fingers (Math), Ted Taverner - Crow (Geography), Mr. Rolfe (Stats), Tweedy Harris (Pure Maths), Kenny Redmore - "Just shut up will you there uh...." (Chemistry), Jack Woolmore (Chemistry), Pongo Cox -"Come along now laddie" - sometimes made students sit on the leg of an upturned lab stool (Biology), Mr. Faulds - with the huge snozz - to show who was boss punched a student square in the face when we were lined up waiting for our first class with him - would be serving jail time today for such an offence (Biology), RI teacher? -  once held the blazer jacket over the head of a student, but continued teaching, while he had an epileptic seizure, Mr. Hirst - "Brick" - would bounce several boys on his knee to test the strength of the stool they had made (Woodwork) - I still have my stool and book holder, Peter May - always enjoyed talking about the stock market with him - "ICI , very good dividend" (Economics), Neddie Bray (Phys Ed), Mr. Batchelor  - in the purple track suit - sometimes whacked boys on the rear end for misbehaviour (Phys Ed), Jake Ashurst - a tough, but fair Headmaster - at assembly one morning stated, "It has come to my notice that someone has written the word 'FUCK' on the lavatory door and I'll not stand for it" - I believe that we each had to pay a shilling to clean up the mess! - in 6th form if you were spotted in a pub, Jake would confront you and say "You're a man about town", Mr. Cooksey - the slippery second in command with greasy slicked back grey hair who would creep through the hallways, peer through classroom windows and gesticulate with his finger for boys to step outside and then demand his hair be cut. Other teachers who I did not take classes from were, Clanger Laing with the rumour of a Luger pistol under his gown, Hettie Hammond - "Been there", Biffer Smith, Jack Northeast, Mr. Renton. For the life of me I cannot remember my Physics teacher during those days.

 

Through my school days I was in the same class group as Roger Ault, who I sadly hear passed away last October. I would be interested in learning of the circumstances of his death. Rog was wonderful with his impersonations of all the various teachers.

 

I enjoyed my cadet days in the Army group - Signals section. I got my Marksman badge first time out at the range on the Lee Enfield 303. Back in those days we could sign out a Lee Enfield with .22 barrel insert and ammo from the Armoury near the cafeteria and perform target practice after school. I also remember mock battles with blank ammo on Farley Mount, visits to Salisbury Plain and helicopter trips, Arduous Training in the Lake District and Field Days.

 

I would be interested in perhaps returning for a class reunion one of these days. I see the class of ‘71 did something recently - I find that everyone now looks so old in their class photo, but I guess I have also been the wrong side of 50 for several years now!

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2005 4:30 AM
Subject: new member

Hi Peter,
We are very pleased to welcome you to the list. Please add a message introducing yourself. It would be much appreciated,
best regards,
jim

Sunday, 29 May 2005

REUNION Friday 2 September 2005: 1955 entrants / 1963 leavers

I've received the following email from Chris Haines, Frederick Finch, Colin Matley and Stuart Mariner:
 
15 The Glade
West Wickham
Kent BR4 9LH
020 8777 6498

8 May 2005
 
Dear 1955er/1962 leaver,
 
I am writing to you because it is almost 50 years since about 100 of us took some very tentative first steps entering Peter Symonds School. In conversation with Frederick Finch and Colin Matley the idea of a London gathering to celebrate those beginnings was floated. Stuart Mariner has kindly arranged a perfect venue:

The Farmers Club in Whitehall on Friday 2 September 2005.
 
Timing is likely to be 6:15pm for 7:30pm or similar and the cost will be confirmed later but it will be modest.
 
We would very much like you to come along. We are hoping that you do have access to email and that you can email a response to us soon at one of the following addresses:
 
Frederick Finch fgf@finchassociates.com
Chris Haines  c.r.haines@city.ac.uk
Colin Matley  colin.matley@virgin.net
Stuart Mariner debbies@martin-company.co.uk
If you really cannot come then you must send a note from your mother excusing you on this occasion.
 
We only have 20 or so names on our contact list, so if you know of other 1955ers then perhaps you would forward this to them or email us with their contact details
 
All good wishes
 
 

Chris Haines
and on behalf of FF, CM and SM

REUNION Friday 2 September 2005: 1955 entrants / 1963 leavers

I've received the following email from Chris Haines, Frederick Finch, Colin Matley and Stuart Mariner:
 
15 The Glade
West Wickham
Kent BR4 9LH
020 8777 6498

8 May 2005
 
Dear 1955er/1962 leaver,
 
I am writing to you because it is almost 50 years since about 100 of us took some very tentative first steps entering Peter Symonds School. In conversation with Frederick Finch and Colin Matley the idea of a London gathering to celebrate those beginnings was floated. Stuart Mariner has kindly arranged a perfect venue:

The Farmers Club in Whitehall on Friday 2 September 2005.
 
Timing is likely to be 6:15pm for 7:30pm or similar and the cost will be confirmed later but it will be modest.
 
We would very much like you to come along. We are hoping that you do have access to email and that you can email a response to us soon at one of the following addresses:
 
Frederick Finch fgf@finchassociates.com
Chris Haines  c.r.haines@city.ac.uk
Colin Matley  colin.matley@virgin.net
Stuart Mariner debbies@martin-company.co.uk
If you really cannot come then you must send a note from your mother excusing you on this occasion.
 
We only have 20 or so names on our contact list, so if you know of other 1955ers then perhaps you would forward this to them or email us with their contact details
 
All good wishes
 
 

Chris Haines
and on behalf of FF, CM and SM

Thursday, 14 April 2005

The OSS newsletter 2005

Hello,
I have posted the latest newsletter from Mike Conlan here 
It includes a report of the London Dinner, various coming sporting events, Founders Day service and a report on the demolition of Varley Lodge and its replacement with a new Learning Resource Centre. You can have memorabilia from the building if you contact the listed numbers.
regards,
 
jim wishart  

The OSS newsletter 2005

Hello,
I have posted the latest newsletter from Mike Conlan here 
It includes a report of the London Dinner, various coming sporting events, Founders Day service and a report on the demolition of Varley Lodge and its replacement with a new Learning Resource Centre. You can have memorabilia from the building if you contact the listed numbers.
regards,
 
jim wishart  

Wednesday, 23 March 2005

new member --langer_sftuj

hello langer_sftuj !
welcome to the list.
Could you give us just a little detail on your peter pips experience? We have to be sure that you really exist as some computers have been trying to join
best regards,
jim wishart, list manager

new member --langer_sftuj

hello langer_sftuj !
welcome to the list.
Could you give us just a little detail on your peter pips experience? We have to be sure that you really exist as some computers have been trying to join
best regards,
jim wishart, list manager

Monday, 14 March 2005

Symondian Magazine

Bernard Webber recently made reference to 'The Symondian' Magazine ... I wonder if anyone out there has a copy (or a copy of a copy), that records my 'leaving' in 1950 ... the entry would have been short, I am sure, because I did not aspire in anything of note ( except playing 'fives' when I should have been doing 'Classics' in the Library) ... the entry probably would have just said :-
Douglas Clews ... "September 1944 til July 1950 - enough said" !!! ...
 
SERIOUSLY, if anyone has such copy, I would be VERY grateful ... I had a copy, but when my Parents came to Oz to join me and my Family in 1968, they left it behind !!! ...
 
Thanks in anticipation ...
 
Doug Clews
Glen Forrest
Western Australia

Symondian Magazine

Bernard Webber recently made reference to 'The Symondian' Magazine ... I wonder if anyone out there has a copy (or a copy of a copy), that records my 'leaving' in 1950 ... the entry would have been short, I am sure, because I did not aspire in anything of note ( except playing 'fives' when I should have been doing 'Classics' in the Library) ... the entry probably would have just said :-
Douglas Clews ... "September 1944 til July 1950 - enough said" !!! ...
 
SERIOUSLY, if anyone has such copy, I would be VERY grateful ... I had a copy, but when my Parents came to Oz to join me and my Family in 1968, they left it behind !!! ...
 
Thanks in anticipation ...
 
Doug Clews
Glen Forrest
Western Australia

Sunday, 13 March 2005

The Duke of Edinburgh's Visit

One of the highlights of my First Year was the day the Duke of Edinburgh dropped by for a visit. Some of my memories were jogged recently when I was browsing through the 1964-1965 edition of The Symondian magazine, and came across an account of that day written by "R.D.W.". So why am I posting this message? Well, here's the closing sentence at the end of the account - "This memorable occasion was marked by beautiful weather, which assisted the work of King and Bailey who made a cine film of the visit". OK, King and Bailey - please step forward - I'd love to see this film - if anyone out there has any knowledge of it, please get in touch!
Thank you, and Hello to all Old Symondians out there!
Bernard Webber
 
 

The Duke of Edinburgh's Visit

One of the highlights of my First Year was the day the Duke of Edinburgh dropped by for a visit. Some of my memories were jogged recently when I was browsing through the 1964-1965 edition of The Symondian magazine, and came across an account of that day written by "R.D.W.". So why am I posting this message? Well, here's the closing sentence at the end of the account - "This memorable occasion was marked by beautiful weather, which assisted the work of King and Bailey who made a cine film of the visit". OK, King and Bailey - please step forward - I'd love to see this film - if anyone out there has any knowledge of it, please get in touch!
Thank you, and Hello to all Old Symondians out there!
Bernard Webber
 
 

Thursday, 10 February 2005

Recent problems on our web-site

Dear Old Symondian,
Recently we have been plagued by supposed 'members' who join, post an advert which gets sent to the membership, and then leave. They have no connection with the school and in fact don't exist as people but are computer generated messages. The consequence of this could be that messages from this site are eliminated as Spam by the ISP. We have tried to keep the list as informal as possible but in order to stop this abuse we have decided to ask prospective members to apply for membership. In this way hopefully we should get no more adverts posted from this site,
best regards,
 
jim  

Recent problems on our web-site

Dear Old Symondian,
Recently we have been plagued by supposed 'members' who join, post an advert which gets sent to the membership, and then leave. They have no connection with the school and in fact don't exist as people but are computer generated messages. The consequence of this could be that messages from this site are eliminated as Spam by the ISP. We have tried to keep the list as informal as possible but in order to stop this abuse we have decided to ask prospective members to apply for membership. In this way hopefully we should get no more adverts posted from this site,
best regards,
 
jim  

Monday, 3 January 2005

Memories of some early fifties masters.

Happy New Year to all!
 
Handy Andy's contribution has prompted me to stir and add this contribution by Russon Wooldridge who is not a member of the list but has his own webpage which includes quite a lot about old school characters. I haven't added it to the 'eulogies' page because the memories are sometimes not so flattering or simply not true!  I post it with apologies where due.
best regards,
 
jim        
 
"School was a way of leaving home for a while, particularly in later years. Wednesday and Saturday afternoons were taken up with sports. Besides the different inter-house competitions, I was on various school teams for cricket, hockey, track-and-field, cross-country running, fives and chess. The senior art master, Randy Renton, and his wife ran one of the boarding houses. Mrs. Renton was famous for her cricket teas, particularly her rice crispy and syrup cakes, so home matches had a special attraction. We went to play teams at a number of schools including Winchester College, Eastleigh, Brockenhurst, Bournemouth, Taunton's and King Edward VI in Southampton, and Midhurst in Sussex
Randy, who was Doc's son-in-law, had foibles that were tolerated by the board of governors, and even admired by the boys. We had a double period with him; he would set up a still life at the beginning, tell us to get on with it, then go round to the pub until it was time to collect in our work. Like his father-in-law he had the reputation of being a skirt-chaser. Whether true or not, the reputation was just part of the aura surrounding the masters. Jack Northeast, the junior art and geography master, and Tom Pierce, the junior English and nature master, both worked freelance on The Hampshire Chronicle. Tom's "slipper" was feared, whereas "E.O." Jones' (junior Latin) "Alsatian" had a bark that was a lot worse than its bite, and his aim with pieces of chalk was erratic to say the least. Whynot Woodhouse, noted for his scepticism and the grounding he gave boys in critical thinking, was the proprietor of the Chronicle. Fluebrush Smith had in-laws in France, and the other senior French master, Oink Griffin, occasionally made laconic remarks about his cottage-cum-nature-sanctuary in Chandlers Ford. Fergie Ferguson, the junior chemistry and biology master, favoured experiments that involved lighting a match, so that he could take a drag on a cigarette in class. Cozens (no-one dared give him a nickname), the senior maths master, brought his dog with him to class; the dog was docile, even if his owner was less so, and would lie under his master's desk. Papa Watts bored us in history class, but entertained us as a member of the chorus in amateur Gilbert and Sullivan productions we attended in Winchester.
Terry had a terrific memory but was not very good at translating Latin. We sat next to each other for most subjects. The chemistry-with-physics master called us Peek and Frean, or Laurel and Hardy, or Fortnum and Mason, etc. In Latin tests I would whisper to Terry where the passage began and ended (it would be from Book II of Virgil's Æneid) and he would then reel off the translation from memory. His elder sister went to Brockenhurst Grammar School and had a copy of the teacher's edition of the maths book we were using one year. So on our way to school on the train we would work backwards from the answer to the question filling in the intermediate steps. We all did very well in maths that year. The master, Harry Hawkins, was sure he knew a relative of mine, and I ended up getting 110% for the year.
Harry was considered slightly mad. We found out early – we had probably inherited the knowledge from the previous year's class – that he could be hypnotized by a swinging light bulb (the classroom was lit by bulbs on long flexes). So we tried it out one day. Harry's bulging eyes were transfixed by the swinging bulb and he walked straight towards it scattering desks left and right. Another day, Harry was bending over the milk crates in the hall during morning break when his balls were grabbed between his legs by a boy who had mistaken him for a tall friend."

Memories of some early fifties masters.

Happy New Year to all!
 
Handy Andy's contribution has prompted me to stir and add this contribution by Russon Wooldridge who is not a member of the list but has his own webpage which includes quite a lot about old school characters. I haven't added it to the 'eulogies' page because the memories are sometimes not so flattering or simply not true!  I post it with apologies where due.
best regards,
 
jim        
 
"School was a way of leaving home for a while, particularly in later years. Wednesday and Saturday afternoons were taken up with sports. Besides the different inter-house competitions, I was on various school teams for cricket, hockey, track-and-field, cross-country running, fives and chess. The senior art master, Randy Renton, and his wife ran one of the boarding houses. Mrs. Renton was famous for her cricket teas, particularly her rice crispy and syrup cakes, so home matches had a special attraction. We went to play teams at a number of schools including Winchester College, Eastleigh, Brockenhurst, Bournemouth, Taunton's and King Edward VI in Southampton, and Midhurst in Sussex
Randy, who was Doc's son-in-law, had foibles that were tolerated by the board of governors, and even admired by the boys. We had a double period with him; he would set up a still life at the beginning, tell us to get on with it, then go round to the pub until it was time to collect in our work. Like his father-in-law he had the reputation of being a skirt-chaser. Whether true or not, the reputation was just part of the aura surrounding the masters. Jack Northeast, the junior art and geography master, and Tom Pierce, the junior English and nature master, both worked freelance on The Hampshire Chronicle. Tom's "slipper" was feared, whereas "E.O." Jones' (junior Latin) "Alsatian" had a bark that was a lot worse than its bite, and his aim with pieces of chalk was erratic to say the least. Whynot Woodhouse, noted for his scepticism and the grounding he gave boys in critical thinking, was the proprietor of the Chronicle. Fluebrush Smith had in-laws in France, and the other senior French master, Oink Griffin, occasionally made laconic remarks about his cottage-cum-nature-sanctuary in Chandlers Ford. Fergie Ferguson, the junior chemistry and biology master, favoured experiments that involved lighting a match, so that he could take a drag on a cigarette in class. Cozens (no-one dared give him a nickname), the senior maths master, brought his dog with him to class; the dog was docile, even if his owner was less so, and would lie under his master's desk. Papa Watts bored us in history class, but entertained us as a member of the chorus in amateur Gilbert and Sullivan productions we attended in Winchester.
Terry had a terrific memory but was not very good at translating Latin. We sat next to each other for most subjects. The chemistry-with-physics master called us Peek and Frean, or Laurel and Hardy, or Fortnum and Mason, etc. In Latin tests I would whisper to Terry where the passage began and ended (it would be from Book II of Virgil's Æneid) and he would then reel off the translation from memory. His elder sister went to Brockenhurst Grammar School and had a copy of the teacher's edition of the maths book we were using one year. So on our way to school on the train we would work backwards from the answer to the question filling in the intermediate steps. We all did very well in maths that year. The master, Harry Hawkins, was sure he knew a relative of mine, and I ended up getting 110% for the year.
Harry was considered slightly mad. We found out early – we had probably inherited the knowledge from the previous year's class – that he could be hypnotized by a swinging light bulb (the classroom was lit by bulbs on long flexes). So we tried it out one day. Harry's bulging eyes were transfixed by the swinging bulb and he walked straight towards it scattering desks left and right. Another day, Harry was bending over the milk crates in the hall during morning break when his balls were grabbed between his legs by a boy who had mistaken him for a tall friend."

Vague memories 1950 -1952

I left PS in May'52, and got on a Cunard Line boat "Scythia" in Southampton (as I recall), and emmigrated to Northern Alberta, Canada.  At that time, I was a 14 year old day student, travelling by train daily from Eastliegh (Bishopstoke).  I am trying to put pieces of the puzzle together. 
Reading through the "Obituaries, eulogies, tributes" was a real mind bender.  Instantly transported back 52 years to a time and place which had become mostly  meaningless and vague.  Strangely enough, I recall a number of teachers but so far have been unable to recognize names of students (on the message board).  I well remember the reign of terror of "EO"  Jones - having to touch my toes to let him administer his sadistic justice.  It all comes back to me - amo amas amat amamus amamus amant.  Since my last Latin class in 1952 I have never used it or had the slightest thought of "Latin is a language as dead as dead can be, first it killed the Romans and now EO damn near killed me".  Another name comes back to me ( or is my mind confusing time and place).  Did we have Len Lecasse for a French Teacher,  Biffer Smith for Math.? George Pierce for Nature Study - Life on the River Ouse. "Ferggy" must have left a real impression, what was his specialty?  The home room teacher was Jack North East, an art teacher as I recall, and a man I had great respect for.  Doc Freeman for divinity - what was that all about?  Life has been one hell of a ride, as it turns out very little of it related to what was passed on to me at Peter Symonds.  In retrospect, why does the older generation pass on such irrelevant bullshit in which they wish they believed but in passing it on they somehow think it gains credibility.  I am as guilty as the ones that went before me, so this is not to cast stones.  Just an observation. Life was taught in terms of absolutes - it turned out to be all about relevance.  The blacks and whites all turned out to be shades of grey.  The world used to have Adolph Hitler now we have George Bush - the more we change the more we stay the same and once again we will find out that might is not right.  If we do not learn from history we are doomed to repeat it.
Well do I remember the Merchant of Venice - Mid Summer's Night Dream.  who was the teacher - I see him so vividly but a name escapes me.  Shakespeare really did have it all figured out " Life is a tale, told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing".  unfortunately we never did get to debate that one - God forbid, this must have been an atheist.
To Doug Clew and all, your site is very well named "unofficial nostalgia" and this was as good as any recreational drug, thank you.  I am sure I will never put the puzzle together, but the fun is trying.  If I ever think I have got it together I will have suceeded in deluding only myself.   So you ask, what is the purpose of this posting?
Like everything else don't look for one!!
 

Vague memories 1950 -1952

I left PS in May'52, and got on a Cunard Line boat "Scythia" in Southampton (as I recall), and emmigrated to Northern Alberta, Canada.  At that time, I was a 14 year old day student, travelling by train daily from Eastliegh (Bishopstoke).  I am trying to put pieces of the puzzle together. 
Reading through the "Obituaries, eulogies, tributes" was a real mind bender.  Instantly transported back 52 years to a time and place which had become mostly  meaningless and vague.  Strangely enough, I recall a number of teachers but so far have been unable to recognize names of students (on the message board).  I well remember the reign of terror of "EO"  Jones - having to touch my toes to let him administer his sadistic justice.  It all comes back to me - amo amas amat amamus amamus amant.  Since my last Latin class in 1952 I have never used it or had the slightest thought of "Latin is a language as dead as dead can be, first it killed the Romans and now EO damn near killed me".  Another name comes back to me ( or is my mind confusing time and place).  Did we have Len Lecasse for a French Teacher,  Biffer Smith for Math.? George Pierce for Nature Study - Life on the River Ouse. "Ferggy" must have left a real impression, what was his specialty?  The home room teacher was Jack North East, an art teacher as I recall, and a man I had great respect for.  Doc Freeman for divinity - what was that all about?  Life has been one hell of a ride, as it turns out very little of it related to what was passed on to me at Peter Symonds.  In retrospect, why does the older generation pass on such irrelevant bullshit in which they wish they believed but in passing it on they somehow think it gains credibility.  I am as guilty as the ones that went before me, so this is not to cast stones.  Just an observation. Life was taught in terms of absolutes - it turned out to be all about relevance.  The blacks and whites all turned out to be shades of grey.  The world used to have Adolph Hitler now we have George Bush - the more we change the more we stay the same and once again we will find out that might is not right.  If we do not learn from history we are doomed to repeat it.
Well do I remember the Merchant of Venice - Mid Summer's Night Dream.  who was the teacher - I see him so vividly but a name escapes me.  Shakespeare really did have it all figured out " Life is a tale, told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing".  unfortunately we never did get to debate that one - God forbid, this must have been an atheist.
To Doug Clew and all, your site is very well named "unofficial nostalgia" and this was as good as any recreational drug, thank you.  I am sure I will never put the puzzle together, but the fun is trying.  If I ever think I have got it together I will have suceeded in deluding only myself.   So you ask, what is the purpose of this posting?
Like everything else don't look for one!!