Sunday, 29 December 2002

Visit to Hurn Airport - RAF section of CCF

Between 1952-53
 
On our return trip some of the lads composed the following words to the tune of The British Grenadiers.  Can anyone fill in the gap?
 
We have an ancient Seafire
It has a list to port
with one wing up and the other wing down
it gives us cause for sport
And when the visiting officer
saw our superb machine
Whizzo, bango what a jolly fine show
treat her with vaseline
 
We visited Hurn Airport
one Friday afternoon
we thought a Stratocruiser
would take us to the moon
but all we got was a Tiger Moth and
the damn thing wouldn't go
Whizzo, bango what a jolly poor show
we hope things will improve
 
The pride of all our section
it is our wooden hut
......................................
...................................... but
we cannot get inside it
'cos CANY keeps the key
Whizzo, Bango what a jolly poor show
.........................................
 
This is recalled by Terry Perkins (my Dad).  Does anyone out there have any recollections of the trip.  My father recalls that we flew in an Avro X1X (Anson).
 
Thanks
 
Lisette

Visit to Hurn Airport - RAF section of CCF

Between 1952-53
 
On our return trip some of the lads composed the following words to the tune of The British Grenadiers.  Can anyone fill in the gap?
 
We have an ancient Seafire
It has a list to port
with one wing up and the other wing down
it gives us cause for sport
And when the visiting officer
saw our superb machine
Whizzo, bango what a jolly fine show
treat her with vaseline
 
We visited Hurn Airport
one Friday afternoon
we thought a Stratocruiser
would take us to the moon
but all we got was a Tiger Moth and
the damn thing wouldn't go
Whizzo, bango what a jolly poor show
we hope things will improve
 
The pride of all our section
it is our wooden hut
......................................
...................................... but
we cannot get inside it
'cos CANY keeps the key
Whizzo, Bango what a jolly poor show
.........................................
 
This is recalled by Terry Perkins (my Dad).  Does anyone out there have any recollections of the trip.  My father recalls that we flew in an Avro X1X (Anson).
 
Thanks
 
Lisette

Monday, 23 December 2002

Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas, everyone, and a prosperous New Year.
 
And a special thanks to the site's Onlie Begetter, Jim, with wishes for a hale and hearty 2003.
 
Chris
(who's exchanging the flatlands of Bedfordshire for the equally flat Vale of York for Christmas and is nostalgic for the rolling hills of Hampshire)

Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas, everyone, and a prosperous New Year.
 
And a special thanks to the site's Onlie Begetter, Jim, with wishes for a hale and hearty 2003.
 
Chris
(who's exchanging the flatlands of Bedfordshire for the equally flat Vale of York for Christmas and is nostalgic for the rolling hills of Hampshire)

Wednesday, 11 December 2002

Merry Christmas, and other things!

Dear Nostalgia Corner member,

I’d like to wish you all a happy Christmas and invite you to visit the site if you haven’t done so lately. There has been a steady if slow stream of contributions from members and lately a new feature has been added, the obituaries of some of the masters -- George Pierce, John Cooksey, Harold Perkins and Paul Woodhouse, taken from a recent edition of ‘The Symondian’. I’d be pleased to have feedback on the new pages and if anyone has similar material to contribute then please feel free to add it.

I recently had an aneurysm repair operation which was wholly successful so I am able to be more active. Three cheers for the NHS. And here I would like to thank Chris Cooper for helping out and volunteering to co-manage the site.

Very best wishes,

Jim Wishart     

Merry Christmas, and other things!

Dear Nostalgia Corner member,

I’d like to wish you all a happy Christmas and invite you to visit the site if you haven’t done so lately. There has been a steady if slow stream of contributions from members and lately a new feature has been added, the obituaries of some of the masters -- George Pierce, John Cooksey, Harold Perkins and Paul Woodhouse, taken from a recent edition of ‘The Symondian’. I’d be pleased to have feedback on the new pages and if anyone has similar material to contribute then please feel free to add it.

I recently had an aneurysm repair operation which was wholly successful so I am able to be more active. Three cheers for the NHS. And here I would like to thank Chris Cooper for helping out and volunteering to co-manage the site.

Very best wishes,

Jim Wishart     

Monday, 2 December 2002

Who was I?

Since I've just visited FriendsReunited, I'll take the opportunity to copy this plaintive little extract from my own biographical note there:
 
... I have a certain difficulty about remembering my own name. Or rather, which of my names I used at school. My full Christian names are 'Christopher Robin', about which I was reticent, for obvious reasons. In early life I was known as 'Robin'. At some point I switched to 'Chris', but I'm not sure exactly when - possibly in the sixth form, possibly when I left school. So I'm not sure under what name I'll be remembered by others from Peter Symonds. But then, I seem to recall that we mostly used surnames...
 
I wonder if that'll jog anyone's memory about me?
 
And I wonder if anyone else has the same weird  problem - not knowing what they were called?

Who was I?

Since I've just visited FriendsReunited, I'll take the opportunity to copy this plaintive little extract from my own biographical note there:
 
... I have a certain difficulty about remembering my own name. Or rather, which of my names I used at school. My full Christian names are 'Christopher Robin', about which I was reticent, for obvious reasons. In early life I was known as 'Robin'. At some point I switched to 'Chris', but I'm not sure exactly when - possibly in the sixth form, possibly when I left school. So I'm not sure under what name I'll be remembered by others from Peter Symonds. But then, I seem to recall that we mostly used surnames...
 
I wonder if that'll jog anyone's memory about me?
 
And I wonder if anyone else has the same weird  problem - not knowing what they were called?

FriendsReunited

I don't why I've only just noticed them, but I see that FriendsReunited has quite a few PS school photos.
 
Not quite enough, though - I'm not in any of 'em ...

FriendsReunited

I don't why I've only just noticed them, but I see that FriendsReunited has quite a few PS school photos.
 
Not quite enough, though - I'm not in any of 'em ...

Sunday, 24 November 2002

Seafire

This might already have been discussed before I joined the group.  If so I apologise!
 
Is anyone able to remember when the Seafire, that sat in a compound between the canteen and the new armoury, was finally removed?  I seem to remember that it was there all the time I was a pupil (1948-53).  In spite of being in the RAF section of the CCF I can't remember ever being allowed to get close to it and couldn't, and still don't, understand quite why it was there.
 
I do remember the "Grasshopper" glider though. I think I "flew" it once.  The launch system was by means of bungee ropes attached to a hook on the glider - the glider being tethered to a convenient tree.  A number of cadets would walk away from the glider with the bungee and when it had stretched sufficiently the tether was released by the pilot and the glider just about became airborne.  I have an idea that there was also a triangular stand that the glider could be mounted on and if the wind was strong enough the machine would answer to the controls (after a fashion)!
 
John Rowe

Seafire

This might already have been discussed before I joined the group.  If so I apologise!
 
Is anyone able to remember when the Seafire, that sat in a compound between the canteen and the new armoury, was finally removed?  I seem to remember that it was there all the time I was a pupil (1948-53).  In spite of being in the RAF section of the CCF I can't remember ever being allowed to get close to it and couldn't, and still don't, understand quite why it was there.
 
I do remember the "Grasshopper" glider though. I think I "flew" it once.  The launch system was by means of bungee ropes attached to a hook on the glider - the glider being tethered to a convenient tree.  A number of cadets would walk away from the glider with the bungee and when it had stretched sufficiently the tether was released by the pilot and the glider just about became airborne.  I have an idea that there was also a triangular stand that the glider could be mounted on and if the wind was strong enough the machine would answer to the controls (after a fashion)!
 
John Rowe

Friday, 25 October 2002

Hello from Canada

I was delighted to come accross this web page. I am already in contact with couple of my old boarder/class mates. I am living in Canada now and would love to hear from anyone who remembers a tall gangly guy who had an unfortunate surname... which meant lot of teasing...tubs, tubbers, enamel ...etc etc
 
If any of the boarders remember me drop me a line anytime. Also, if  anyone needs some guidance travelling to Alberta I am your man.
 
Great job on this site Jim.
 
Well done.

Hello from Canada

I was delighted to come accross this web page. I am already in contact with couple of my old boarder/class mates. I am living in Canada now and would love to hear from anyone who remembers a tall gangly guy who had an unfortunate surname... which meant lot of teasing...tubs, tubbers, enamel ...etc etc
 
If any of the boarders remember me drop me a line anytime. Also, if  anyone needs some guidance travelling to Alberta I am your man.
 
Great job on this site Jim.
 
Well done.

Wednesday, 16 October 2002

Photos from the 70's

I posted some a few weeks back.... can anyone help identify some of the people.... I can get most... but memory escapes me on some of them... 

Photos from the 70's

I posted some a few weeks back.... can anyone help identify some of the people.... I can get most... but memory escapes me on some of them... 

Thursday, 10 October 2002

old symondians society

This message has been deleted by the author.

old symondians society

This message has been deleted by the author.

Saturday, 5 October 2002

Winchester Library

So now for something completely different?
I enjoyed the Winchester Cycle Company thread so although it is strictly off topic, please excuse me, maybe someone can swap memories about another Winchester institution, and that is what nostalgia is all about eh?
I was nine years old when the war finished and my brother and I met our father after six years of absence. Our mother had had a rather sheltered life up to that time and we hadn't gone out much, and when my father took us to the library on Jewry Street it was a whole new exciting world. One book that had a very big impression on us was a huge volume, well it seemed like that at the time, one year of National Geographic Magazines bound together, with board covers bound in black leather with gold lettering. And the most memorable articles were about Professor Auguste Piccard's adventures in the stratosphere in a balloon, and in the depths of the sea in what I think is called a bathyscape.  Many beautiful pictures of the weird creatures living there. And another volume introduced us to dinosaurs.
Did anyone else see those books?
best regards,
jim 

Winchester Library

So now for something completely different?
I enjoyed the Winchester Cycle Company thread so although it is strictly off topic, please excuse me, maybe someone can swap memories about another Winchester institution, and that is what nostalgia is all about eh?
I was nine years old when the war finished and my brother and I met our father after six years of absence. Our mother had had a rather sheltered life up to that time and we hadn't gone out much, and when my father took us to the library on Jewry Street it was a whole new exciting world. One book that had a very big impression on us was a huge volume, well it seemed like that at the time, one year of National Geographic Magazines bound together, with board covers bound in black leather with gold lettering. And the most memorable articles were about Professor Auguste Piccard's adventures in the stratosphere in a balloon, and in the depths of the sea in what I think is called a bathyscape.  Many beautiful pictures of the weird creatures living there. And another volume introduced us to dinosaurs.
Did anyone else see those books?
best regards,
jim 

Thursday, 3 October 2002

Making contact

Good to see this site and to see the banter ... drags up stuff I'd completly forgotten about.
Some things you never forget though like the mad dash at lunch time for the Canteen ( which was stupidly placed down the bottom of the field. Of course fine in summer months but as soon as it rained the trip became a negotiation of the fast developing mud slide and then having to queue up in the rain outside. Used to get covered in mud.
 
I was one of the last PS boarders, and the last first year intake before the change to a sixth form college. the place became a building site (got covered in more mud).
 
Does anyone remember the mad concker fight? One morning there were two lines on opposite side of the quadrangle each containing about 60 lads and we decided it would be fun just to throw conckers at each other. It was like the Somme, missiles darkened the sky as hundreds of conkers, carefully collected over weeks and weeks flew across the quad. It might have been symbolic of the future but I worked out a supply deal to collect spent conkers and restock the line (I think I wangled the latest girlie mags or something).
 
Take care y'all
Bruce Brassington

Making contact

Good to see this site and to see the banter ... drags up stuff I'd completly forgotten about.
Some things you never forget though like the mad dash at lunch time for the Canteen ( which was stupidly placed down the bottom of the field. Of course fine in summer months but as soon as it rained the trip became a negotiation of the fast developing mud slide and then having to queue up in the rain outside. Used to get covered in mud.
 
I was one of the last PS boarders, and the last first year intake before the change to a sixth form college. the place became a building site (got covered in more mud).
 
Does anyone remember the mad concker fight? One morning there were two lines on opposite side of the quadrangle each containing about 60 lads and we decided it would be fun just to throw conckers at each other. It was like the Somme, missiles darkened the sky as hundreds of conkers, carefully collected over weeks and weeks flew across the quad. It might have been symbolic of the future but I worked out a supply deal to collect spent conkers and restock the line (I think I wangled the latest girlie mags or something).
 
Take care y'all
Bruce Brassington

Tuesday, 24 September 2002

Upper 6th 1971

Dear All ,
 
I am pleased to announce that ,after a period of 9 months  ,I have at last managed to upload a photo of my merry band of buddies. It was taken on April 1st after a fantastic response from Junior assembly to the ' School Photograph outside the Old Building at break time ' April Fool we announced that morning. I don't think the young 'uns enjoyed it but we had a good laugh. Photo taken by Nick Ray.
 
A special quiz for all who were at PSC at  that time !!  Can you name any of this infamous bunch ? Are you one of them ?
 
Keith
 
PS - I know the names of all of them !! Answers later .
 

Upper 6th 1971

Dear All ,
 
I am pleased to announce that ,after a period of 9 months  ,I have at last managed to upload a photo of my merry band of buddies. It was taken on April 1st after a fantastic response from Junior assembly to the ' School Photograph outside the Old Building at break time ' April Fool we announced that morning. I don't think the young 'uns enjoyed it but we had a good laugh. Photo taken by Nick Ray.
 
A special quiz for all who were at PSC at  that time !!  Can you name any of this infamous bunch ? Are you one of them ?
 
Keith
 
PS - I know the names of all of them !! Answers later .
 

Thursday, 12 September 2002

your manager is back

hello everyone,
I am pleased to say that I am back from hospital just having an aneurysm repair op, and I am feeling fine.  What a marvel is modern medecine!
I hope to join in a bit more now,
best regards,
jim wishart  

your manager is back

hello everyone,
I am pleased to say that I am back from hospital just having an aneurysm repair op, and I am feeling fine.  What a marvel is modern medecine!
I hope to join in a bit more now,
best regards,
jim wishart  

Wednesday, 28 August 2002

Football season 65-6

Is anyone out there prepared to admit playing football against Brockenhurst, I believe in the 1965/6 season for the 2nd year team. I sometimes hope it was only a nightmare. That year the whole team, except for two (I think), were boarders and this match fell on an exeat weekend. At least 9 reserves and the other two playing out of position. I normally played right full back but started the game on the left wing.
After a hard fought match we narrowly lost 20-0. This was presumably some sort of record as Jake didn't read out the result in assembly on the Monday morning with all the others. At least England won the World Cup that year! 

Football season 65-6

Is anyone out there prepared to admit playing football against Brockenhurst, I believe in the 1965/6 season for the 2nd year team. I sometimes hope it was only a nightmare. That year the whole team, except for two (I think), were boarders and this match fell on an exeat weekend. At least 9 reserves and the other two playing out of position. I normally played right full back but started the game on the left wing.
After a hard fought match we narrowly lost 20-0. This was presumably some sort of record as Jake didn't read out the result in assembly on the Monday morning with all the others. At least England won the World Cup that year! 

Monday, 26 August 2002

Happy mid-30s.

Way back in 1934, I started at Peter Pips as a scholarship boy travelling daily by train from Eastleigh.  I remember an early welcome by Doc Freeman who ran his eye over us and said “ The cream of the brains of the Administrative County of Hampshire?   You’re more like the sediment at the bottom”.  At that time we had a school war cry to encourage our teams.  It went 

Ee nick-a-deena deena deena, Ee nick-a-deena dina doh,

Ho, Ho, Hoppity Ho, Pull up your socks the Peters.

While I was there, Doc announced that it was a version of an Australian chant and it lowered the dignity of the school, so he banned its use.

 

I have very much enjoyed reading all your messages and I was surprised by how many names I remember.  CANY was teaching Geography in the end room of the new block of classrooms to the left of the main building.   A little way back towards the main building was EO Jones’ lair where he lived with his ‘Alsatian’.  I was hopeless at Latin but his Alsatian only bit me once.  At that time his Alsatian’s bark was worse than it’s bite.  Being a two-inch square section of timber, the ‘footprint’ of its contact was several square inches and so the bite was reasonably gentle.

 

My next Latin teacher was Cooksey.   He taught me very little Latin but he REALLY taught me how to HATE !!!!!!   My surname is Br챕haut and Cooksey delighted in grabbing me by the hair and bouncing me up and down on my seat while declining my name.   BrayOH, BrayASS, Brayat, Brayamus, Brayatis, Brayant.   Printable comments fail me.  After a couple of years, I was thrown out of Latin and left to study Physics on my own, supervised by Mr St.John, pronounced Sinjon.  My science teacher was Mr Tanner and the skill of those teachers allowed me to do well in the Oxford School Certificate examination.

 

I remember a teacher who we called Wick, perhaps because he ruled Wick (or was it Wyke) Lodge.  He always wore a clerical collar and was reputed to spend much time in the bar of the ‘Jolly Farmer’.   I was taught English by EGAP.  He was Mr Page and his nickname was his real name spelt backwards.  I wonder if CANY was Mr Yates’ initials?   Paul Wodehouse was another teacher and we knew of his connection with the ‘Hampshire Chronicle’ and I think his wife may have been its editor.   I think that Mr Cozens might have taught us Maths from textbooks that he had had published.

 

Two other teachers there were real characters.  Punch taught German.   He was a short stocky man with a very broad cast in his eyes and was reputed to have been a spy in World War I.  The optical axes of his eyes seemed to meet at nearly 90 degrees, and we never did discover which of us was being observed.  He used to bring an old clockwork gramophone into the classroom and play a German song, Nach Frankreich zogen zwei Granadier by Schumann. We learned and sang this and the quality of our singing was matched only by the abysmal quality of the gramophone.   The other teacher was History teacher Dickey Childs.  He was very deaf and used his right hand for cupping his ear and for throwing the blackboard rubber.   On a scale of 1 to 10 his throwing was rated 9 for velocity but only 3 for accuracy.   The class needed good reflexes to survive.

 

Happy days !

Happy mid-30s.

Way back in 1934, I started at Peter Pips as a scholarship boy travelling daily by train from Eastleigh.  I remember an early welcome by Doc Freeman who ran his eye over us and said “ The cream of the brains of the Administrative County of Hampshire?   You’re more like the sediment at the bottom”.  At that time we had a school war cry to encourage our teams.  It went 

Ee nick-a-deena deena deena, Ee nick-a-deena dina doh,

Ho, Ho, Hoppity Ho, Pull up your socks the Peters.

While I was there, Doc announced that it was a version of an Australian chant and it lowered the dignity of the school, so he banned its use.

 

I have very much enjoyed reading all your messages and I was surprised by how many names I remember.  CANY was teaching Geography in the end room of the new block of classrooms to the left of the main building.   A little way back towards the main building was EO Jones’ lair where he lived with his ‘Alsatian’.  I was hopeless at Latin but his Alsatian only bit me once.  At that time his Alsatian’s bark was worse than it’s bite.  Being a two-inch square section of timber, the ‘footprint’ of its contact was several square inches and so the bite was reasonably gentle.

 

My next Latin teacher was Cooksey.   He taught me very little Latin but he REALLY taught me how to HATE !!!!!!   My surname is Br챕haut and Cooksey delighted in grabbing me by the hair and bouncing me up and down on my seat while declining my name.   BrayOH, BrayASS, Brayat, Brayamus, Brayatis, Brayant.   Printable comments fail me.  After a couple of years, I was thrown out of Latin and left to study Physics on my own, supervised by Mr St.John, pronounced Sinjon.  My science teacher was Mr Tanner and the skill of those teachers allowed me to do well in the Oxford School Certificate examination.

 

I remember a teacher who we called Wick, perhaps because he ruled Wick (or was it Wyke) Lodge.  He always wore a clerical collar and was reputed to spend much time in the bar of the ‘Jolly Farmer’.   I was taught English by EGAP.  He was Mr Page and his nickname was his real name spelt backwards.  I wonder if CANY was Mr Yates’ initials?   Paul Wodehouse was another teacher and we knew of his connection with the ‘Hampshire Chronicle’ and I think his wife may have been its editor.   I think that Mr Cozens might have taught us Maths from textbooks that he had had published.

 

Two other teachers there were real characters.  Punch taught German.   He was a short stocky man with a very broad cast in his eyes and was reputed to have been a spy in World War I.  The optical axes of his eyes seemed to meet at nearly 90 degrees, and we never did discover which of us was being observed.  He used to bring an old clockwork gramophone into the classroom and play a German song, Nach Frankreich zogen zwei Granadier by Schumann. We learned and sang this and the quality of our singing was matched only by the abysmal quality of the gramophone.   The other teacher was History teacher Dickey Childs.  He was very deaf and used his right hand for cupping his ear and for throwing the blackboard rubber.   On a scale of 1 to 10 his throwing was rated 9 for velocity but only 3 for accuracy.   The class needed good reflexes to survive.

 

Happy days !

Saturday, 24 August 2002

Old symondian's october dinner

hello all,
Does anyone know the date of the dinner? I see the OSA website is down at the moment,
 
best regards,
 
jim    

Old symondian's october dinner

hello all,
Does anyone know the date of the dinner? I see the OSA website is down at the moment,
 
best regards,
 
jim    

Tuesday, 20 August 2002

Hockey - what year?

Anyone want to guess the year this was written in the annual School magazine? Mike

 

SECOND XI HOCKEY

This season will perhaps be remembered longer than any other, not for the standard of hockey, but rather for the appalling winter. As a result of the latter fewer than half of the original fixtures were played, and of these only three matches were played in the Easter term. However, this was by no means an unsuccessful season. The team lost only two of the ten matches. At last, it seems that there is some pride in playing for what can be called a "Second Eleven", rather than a team of "also rans".

Dimmer kept goal throughout the season and improved as it progressed; although at one or two matches he spent most of the time admiring the surrounding countryside (there being little else for him to do). Renton, at right-back, after finding some difficulty early in the season in stopping the ball, improved steadily and became a very sound back. Biyth proved a strong quick-tackling back and he and Renton soon became a force to be reckoned with, the two of them saving many a dangerous situation. Hammond, at right-half showed himself to be a fast, hard-tackling player, but he could improve his ball distribution. Boardley (when he managed to stay on his feet) proved he was a hard-working and keen centre-half, playing his best against the stronger teams. Winsey, at left-half, completed the defence and proved a strong and boisterous player with a good sense of positioning, though, he tends to wander too far up the field at times. Palmer played at right-wing throughout the season, and had a valuable inside-forward in Tickner, a busy and enterprising player, whose speed proved a valuable asset and bemused many a defence. Buckett, at centre-forward, was consistently good, hitting the ball accurately and hard, (even with his ancient stick) and this ability earned him many fine goals. Tredray, before being called to the realms of higher service, proved the inspiration of the attack, having excellent ball control and accurate distribution. His place was then filled by McGhie, a player of great ability, with an extremely hard shot; Dark at left-wing completed the attack, and with his sudden bursts of speed, filled a difficult position with success though he should learn more ways of beating his opponents.

However, this was only the regular team, and several others played in one or two matches. Bolt played in all three of the Easter term matches, and with his fearless tackling and enthusiastic approach became a fine asset to the defence; Stephenson, at the start of the season, played hockey of high quality. The fact that, in all the years he has played school hockey, he has never been on the losing side, is an obvious guide to his ability. Hassall and Malcolmson also played, and for part of the match against the Old Boys, we even had Goater in goal.

With this improvement in school hockey, and with an Under 14 and Colts team, a constant supply of players has at last been realised; and one hopes that, with practice, School hockey will continue to improve in standard

Hockey - what year?

Anyone want to guess the year this was written in the annual School magazine? Mike

 

SECOND XI HOCKEY

This season will perhaps be remembered longer than any other, not for the standard of hockey, but rather for the appalling winter. As a result of the latter fewer than half of the original fixtures were played, and of these only three matches were played in the Easter term. However, this was by no means an unsuccessful season. The team lost only two of the ten matches. At last, it seems that there is some pride in playing for what can be called a "Second Eleven", rather than a team of "also rans".

Dimmer kept goal throughout the season and improved as it progressed; although at one or two matches he spent most of the time admiring the surrounding countryside (there being little else for him to do). Renton, at right-back, after finding some difficulty early in the season in stopping the ball, improved steadily and became a very sound back. Biyth proved a strong quick-tackling back and he and Renton soon became a force to be reckoned with, the two of them saving many a dangerous situation. Hammond, at right-half showed himself to be a fast, hard-tackling player, but he could improve his ball distribution. Boardley (when he managed to stay on his feet) proved he was a hard-working and keen centre-half, playing his best against the stronger teams. Winsey, at left-half, completed the defence and proved a strong and boisterous player with a good sense of positioning, though, he tends to wander too far up the field at times. Palmer played at right-wing throughout the season, and had a valuable inside-forward in Tickner, a busy and enterprising player, whose speed proved a valuable asset and bemused many a defence. Buckett, at centre-forward, was consistently good, hitting the ball accurately and hard, (even with his ancient stick) and this ability earned him many fine goals. Tredray, before being called to the realms of higher service, proved the inspiration of the attack, having excellent ball control and accurate distribution. His place was then filled by McGhie, a player of great ability, with an extremely hard shot; Dark at left-wing completed the attack, and with his sudden bursts of speed, filled a difficult position with success though he should learn more ways of beating his opponents.

However, this was only the regular team, and several others played in one or two matches. Bolt played in all three of the Easter term matches, and with his fearless tackling and enthusiastic approach became a fine asset to the defence; Stephenson, at the start of the season, played hockey of high quality. The fact that, in all the years he has played school hockey, he has never been on the losing side, is an obvious guide to his ability. Hassall and Malcolmson also played, and for part of the match against the Old Boys, we even had Goater in goal.

With this improvement in school hockey, and with an Under 14 and Colts team, a constant supply of players has at last been realised; and one hopes that, with practice, School hockey will continue to improve in standard

Sunday, 11 August 2002

Ernie Gladwell

One master from my era at PSS ('55-'63) whom I remember with affection was Ernie Gladwell. I learnt some German and some of that strange dialect, Scientific German, from him.
 
I distnctly remember the first words of the first lesson from him: he held up one finger and said, loudly and clearly : "Finger!" (pronounced the German way, like 'singer'). There must have been a lot more afterwards, since I seem to know more German than that, but that's the lesson that stuck in memory.
 
That and the time when I hiccupped loudly and he told me to clear out before he knocked my block off. He seemed to think there was something insincere about the hiccup.
 
Oh, and the time he recommended the novel he'd just read: "Limbo '90", by Bernard Wolfe. I got the book from the library and was amazed to find it contained sex. (I can recommend it too: it's about a post-nuclear-holocaust America in which people voluntarily replace their limbs with robotic prosthetics. You'll have trouble finding it, though: the very first link turned up by Google is headed: 'Bernard Wolfe: A Forgotten Writer'.)
 
I haven't seen much mention of 'Ernie'. Does anyone else remember him? Does anyone know if he's alive and well?
 
Chris
 
 
 
 
 

Ernie Gladwell

One master from my era at PSS ('55-'63) whom I remember with affection was Ernie Gladwell. I learnt some German and some of that strange dialect, Scientific German, from him.
 
I distnctly remember the first words of the first lesson from him: he held up one finger and said, loudly and clearly : "Finger!" (pronounced the German way, like 'singer'). There must have been a lot more afterwards, since I seem to know more German than that, but that's the lesson that stuck in memory.
 
That and the time when I hiccupped loudly and he told me to clear out before he knocked my block off. He seemed to think there was something insincere about the hiccup.
 
Oh, and the time he recommended the novel he'd just read: "Limbo '90", by Bernard Wolfe. I got the book from the library and was amazed to find it contained sex. (I can recommend it too: it's about a post-nuclear-holocaust America in which people voluntarily replace their limbs with robotic prosthetics. You'll have trouble finding it, though: the very first link turned up by Google is headed: 'Bernard Wolfe: A Forgotten Writer'.)
 
I haven't seen much mention of 'Ernie'. Does anyone else remember him? Does anyone know if he's alive and well?
 
Chris
 
 
 
 
 

La vacance

Hello, everyone
 
It's a bit quiet on the message board lately.  I dare say everyone is enjoying the holiday season.  It makes it very easy for a so-called manager like me! Feels almost like an honorary position.
 
I took a look at the PSC Website at http://www.psc.ac.uk just now. It's quite active and gives a good impression of activity at Owen's Road. There's a nice little potted history of Peter Symonds, too.
 
I see that the College is an 'Investor in People'. What does it mean?
 
And don't forget Chris Boulter's PSC email directory at http://list.psc.ac.uk/ - which lists people from both School and College eras.
 
I used to be able to get automatic notifications of additions to the directory, but I can't see any facility for setting that up now - am I missing something? Anyway,  I've set WatchThatPage to keep track of it.
 
So long for now,
 
Chris

La vacance

Hello, everyone
 
It's a bit quiet on the message board lately.  I dare say everyone is enjoying the holiday season.  It makes it very easy for a so-called manager like me! Feels almost like an honorary position.
 
I took a look at the PSC Website at http://www.psc.ac.uk just now. It's quite active and gives a good impression of activity at Owen's Road. There's a nice little potted history of Peter Symonds, too.
 
I see that the College is an 'Investor in People'. What does it mean?
 
And don't forget Chris Boulter's PSC email directory at http://list.psc.ac.uk/ - which lists people from both School and College eras.
 
I used to be able to get automatic notifications of additions to the directory, but I can't see any facility for setting that up now - am I missing something? Anyway,  I've set WatchThatPage to keep track of it.
 
So long for now,
 
Chris

Monday, 10 June 2002

Helping with managing (was: Any volunteers?)

Hi, Jim
 
Sorry to take so long replying. I've started a new thread so that this topic shows up on the most recent page of the messageboard.
 
Yes, I'd love to help out ... given your firm promise that no work's involved ... ! You certainly shouldn't have to keep pushing the thing along by yourself.
 
So what does it involve?
 
Best,
 
Chris
 
 
 >>>
Hello all,
I have been thinking. I think it might be a good idea to get others involved in the management of the list.  It would bring in new ideas, and maybe nettie expertise and also would be a good insurance policy.
Chris Cooper kindly put his name forward a year or so ago when there seemed to be a possible emergency health situation developing [since receded], and I would certainly be pleased if he volunteer again, but I throw it open,
There are no duties really, everyone is very well behaved but there is no pay,
 
[which reminds me of one of Doc's favourite Collects- "to labour and not to ask for any reward"]
best regards,
 
jim wishart       

Helping with managing (was: Any volunteers?)

Hi, Jim
 
Sorry to take so long replying. I've started a new thread so that this topic shows up on the most recent page of the messageboard.
 
Yes, I'd love to help out ... given your firm promise that no work's involved ... ! You certainly shouldn't have to keep pushing the thing along by yourself.
 
So what does it involve?
 
Best,
 
Chris
 
 
 >>>
Hello all,
I have been thinking. I think it might be a good idea to get others involved in the management of the list.  It would bring in new ideas, and maybe nettie expertise and also would be a good insurance policy.
Chris Cooper kindly put his name forward a year or so ago when there seemed to be a possible emergency health situation developing [since receded], and I would certainly be pleased if he volunteer again, but I throw it open,
There are no duties really, everyone is very well behaved but there is no pay,
 
[which reminds me of one of Doc's favourite Collects- "to labour and not to ask for any reward"]
best regards,
 
jim wishart       

Sunday, 2 June 2002

Reunion

Hi Chaps,
I've been hearing about these websites for some time and have finally got round to having a look. I am so pleased I did 'cos we are coming out of the woodwork now! I had an indirect call a week ago from a classmate, Ali Walker. Hadn't seen hide nor hair of him for 30 years and damn me if the following Friday there were about 15 of us in the pub again, laughing our socks off! Now I've found this website too and half the photos are of my other pals.
Well, look, I'd love to go on and on but suffice it to say I have a number of team photos from the 60s and am happy to share them with you. I noticed Roger Ault on the recent Athletics photo, I was in the pub with him last night! We were talking about those same guys in the photo: Jim Gove, Rich Player, Tony Steele...........and Badminton, my Housemaster, The amazing Mr Renton, Ted Milam, Elliot ( I'll have to recite my seniority list to remember which of the brothers)..........
Please contact me and tell me how to proceed.
Regards to you all.
Bill Berridge

Reunion

Hi Chaps,
I've been hearing about these websites for some time and have finally got round to having a look. I am so pleased I did 'cos we are coming out of the woodwork now! I had an indirect call a week ago from a classmate, Ali Walker. Hadn't seen hide nor hair of him for 30 years and damn me if the following Friday there were about 15 of us in the pub again, laughing our socks off! Now I've found this website too and half the photos are of my other pals.
Well, look, I'd love to go on and on but suffice it to say I have a number of team photos from the 60s and am happy to share them with you. I noticed Roger Ault on the recent Athletics photo, I was in the pub with him last night! We were talking about those same guys in the photo: Jim Gove, Rich Player, Tony Steele...........and Badminton, my Housemaster, The amazing Mr Renton, Ted Milam, Elliot ( I'll have to recite my seniority list to remember which of the brothers)..........
Please contact me and tell me how to proceed.
Regards to you all.
Bill Berridge

Saturday, 1 June 2002

Past Masters

First, although my name at PSSW was Mazzeo, for many years my surname has been Pennington and from that has come the dreaded initials PP, the scourge of many an official whose only word is 'no'. So that gets that out of the way. I was driving back this week from DC (I live in West Virginia) and Diane Rehms on Public Radio had dedicated a whole section to reminisences of past teachers. Only the night before I had read for the first time this message board so I used the time on I-70 to think of my time at Peter Pips (57-64). I saw the notes about Mr Perkins. To us he was Perky. Next door to him was Ozzy Osbourne in the Woodwork Room. I walked in from IIIp proudly intent on making a Sheraton bookcase or the like. After nine months and having whittled out every mistake I had a lopsided six inch long spade scraper with a miscentred hole. Thanks to Ted Taverner I know all the capitals of South America and the population of Australia as it was in 1959 and that cocoa beans come from cacao , or was it the other way round. Jack Northeast was never able to get me to draw a BEA Vanguard that didn't have lopsided wings and Pa Watts did teach me the difference between the Beaker People in Round Barrows, or was it Long Barrows, and the non Beaker People who lived in long barrows or.....  Tom Pearce beat into me 110 British birds from those dreaded cards that would appear high up on the wall in his room - but now I am active in both the RSPB and the Audubon. Hetty taught me German. Well, I think he did because one day we had a visitor from Germany and it slowly dawned on us that neither the visitor or Hetty understood a word of what the other was saying. But it didn't matter as we used that class to discuss politics and we sat there one day waiting for a nuclear bomb to drop on us as Kennedy and Kruschev went eyeball to eyeball over Cuba. I suppose I should think of Neddy Bray and either maths (with a slipper) or P.T. but all I can think of is that pea green soup called the swimming pool. Anyway I was in Northbrook and we were only good at crosscountry and chess. The first because we all lived well away from Winchester and there was the 47 bus to catch and the only game one could play on the bus was chess ( or grabbing berets off the County High girls). After 56 years I now know that I have to know why before doing anything. I never knew why I had to know that sinsquaredA+ cosquaredA = 2sinA cosA so Chalky White was pushing against a tough load. As was Ron Brown in physics all though two years of misery doing physics was well worth it when Chris Herridge arrived late in class and Ron roared 'Why are you late?' only somehow the emphasis got shifted from 'late' to 'you' and the 'late' sounded more like 'last'.. Chris repled with good sound Einstein logic that somebody is always going to be last. The eruption was spectacular and worth my dodgy mark in A levels. I saw mention of Loch Ewe and Achnasheen. Ah, happy summer days in endless rain and with endless dead sheep. Jock Shields, who later had the priviledge of caning me, taught me latin for a year. The Romans in Gaul were in trouble and needed help but it was on its way. I knew the word started with re  something or other but I couldn't get the word out until I blurted out that Caesar had arrived with refreshments. Hey ho   PP

Past Masters

First, although my name at PSSW was Mazzeo, for many years my surname has been Pennington and from that has come the dreaded initials PP, the scourge of many an official whose only word is 'no'. So that gets that out of the way. I was driving back this week from DC (I live in West Virginia) and Diane Rehms on Public Radio had dedicated a whole section to reminisences of past teachers. Only the night before I had read for the first time this message board so I used the time on I-70 to think of my time at Peter Pips (57-64). I saw the notes about Mr Perkins. To us he was Perky. Next door to him was Ozzy Osbourne in the Woodwork Room. I walked in from IIIp proudly intent on making a Sheraton bookcase or the like. After nine months and having whittled out every mistake I had a lopsided six inch long spade scraper with a miscentred hole. Thanks to Ted Taverner I know all the capitals of South America and the population of Australia as it was in 1959 and that cocoa beans come from cacao , or was it the other way round. Jack Northeast was never able to get me to draw a BEA Vanguard that didn't have lopsided wings and Pa Watts did teach me the difference between the Beaker People in Round Barrows, or was it Long Barrows, and the non Beaker People who lived in long barrows or.....  Tom Pearce beat into me 110 British birds from those dreaded cards that would appear high up on the wall in his room - but now I am active in both the RSPB and the Audubon. Hetty taught me German. Well, I think he did because one day we had a visitor from Germany and it slowly dawned on us that neither the visitor or Hetty understood a word of what the other was saying. But it didn't matter as we used that class to discuss politics and we sat there one day waiting for a nuclear bomb to drop on us as Kennedy and Kruschev went eyeball to eyeball over Cuba. I suppose I should think of Neddy Bray and either maths (with a slipper) or P.T. but all I can think of is that pea green soup called the swimming pool. Anyway I was in Northbrook and we were only good at crosscountry and chess. The first because we all lived well away from Winchester and there was the 47 bus to catch and the only game one could play on the bus was chess ( or grabbing berets off the County High girls). After 56 years I now know that I have to know why before doing anything. I never knew why I had to know that sinsquaredA+ cosquaredA = 2sinA cosA so Chalky White was pushing against a tough load. As was Ron Brown in physics all though two years of misery doing physics was well worth it when Chris Herridge arrived late in class and Ron roared 'Why are you late?' only somehow the emphasis got shifted from 'late' to 'you' and the 'late' sounded more like 'last'.. Chris repled with good sound Einstein logic that somebody is always going to be last. The eruption was spectacular and worth my dodgy mark in A levels. I saw mention of Loch Ewe and Achnasheen. Ah, happy summer days in endless rain and with endless dead sheep. Jock Shields, who later had the priviledge of caning me, taught me latin for a year. The Romans in Gaul were in trouble and needed help but it was on its way. I knew the word started with re  something or other but I couldn't get the word out until I blurted out that Caesar had arrived with refreshments. Hey ho   PP

Thursday, 30 May 2002

Tooth cleaning in India

I've finally found an answer for EO Jones. He was our form teacher in 1952-53 but he also liked to reminisce about his time in India - in the Indian Army I suppose?  He told us one day that he didn't clean his teeth with a toothbrush; he thought that tooth brushes damaged gums.  I don't recall him telling us what he did clean his teeth with but he did tell us about the way the 'Natives' in India cleaned their teeth - they used twigs.  He went on to say that he never could discover what sort of twigs they were or where they came from.
 
I have the answer!  I've recently been reading a travel book by Paul Theroux  (The Great Railway Bazaar) and he tells how the Tamils teeth are prominent "and glisten from repeated scrubbing with peeled green twigs".  The best toothbrush twigs are found in the forests of Madhya Pradesh and are sold in bundles bound like cheroots at the stations in the province.
 
Too late for EO now I suppose
 
John Rowe

Tooth cleaning in India

I've finally found an answer for EO Jones. He was our form teacher in 1952-53 but he also liked to reminisce about his time in India - in the Indian Army I suppose?  He told us one day that he didn't clean his teeth with a toothbrush; he thought that tooth brushes damaged gums.  I don't recall him telling us what he did clean his teeth with but he did tell us about the way the 'Natives' in India cleaned their teeth - they used twigs.  He went on to say that he never could discover what sort of twigs they were or where they came from.
 
I have the answer!  I've recently been reading a travel book by Paul Theroux  (The Great Railway Bazaar) and he tells how the Tamils teeth are prominent "and glisten from repeated scrubbing with peeled green twigs".  The best toothbrush twigs are found in the forests of Madhya Pradesh and are sold in bundles bound like cheroots at the stations in the province.
 
Too late for EO now I suppose
 
John Rowe

Wednesday, 22 May 2002

Another Recent Reunion Report

I don’t recall why, but when Nigel Palmer joined this community I clicked on his name and discovered to my amazement that he lives just eight miles from me. We have since been in contact by email and telephone and we met up for lunch at 12.30 on Tuesday 21st May 2002 at ""Finz" a rather smart fish restaurant in Salem, a town situated in between our homes in Massachusetts USA.

Salem is the birthplace of the writer Nathaniel Hawthorne and is a beautiful town with a long maritime tradition and is, of course, one-time home to the notorious "Witch Trials" described in the Arthur Miller Novel "The Crucible" and portrayed by Daniel Day Lewis and Winona Ryder in the movie of the same name.

We had a very enjoyable meal and a couple of beers and talked about our times at Peter Symonds. (we overlapped; Nigel Left in 1951 whereas I left in 1957) such a long time ago. We agreed to meet again.

Peter Churchill

Another Recent Reunion Report

I don’t recall why, but when Nigel Palmer joined this community I clicked on his name and discovered to my amazement that he lives just eight miles from me. We have since been in contact by email and telephone and we met up for lunch at 12.30 on Tuesday 21st May 2002 at ""Finz" a rather smart fish restaurant in Salem, a town situated in between our homes in Massachusetts USA.

Salem is the birthplace of the writer Nathaniel Hawthorne and is a beautiful town with a long maritime tradition and is, of course, one-time home to the notorious "Witch Trials" described in the Arthur Miller Novel "The Crucible" and portrayed by Daniel Day Lewis and Winona Ryder in the movie of the same name.

We had a very enjoyable meal and a couple of beers and talked about our times at Peter Symonds. (we overlapped; Nigel Left in 1951 whereas I left in 1957) such a long time ago. We agreed to meet again.

Peter Churchill

Sunday, 19 May 2002

john lawford, new old boy

Hi everyone,
I occasionally trawl through the Friends Reunited Peter Pips site to see if I can interest anyone in this site.  Just had this from an old boy who may be joining when he can get sorted after a hospital visit.  Maybe there is someone out there who knows him,
 
Dear James
Thanks for the email, I am sorry to be so late in responding but I have just
come home after a short spell in hospital and I am not fully on line at the
moment.
I am very interested in the site and would like to join you and perhaps some
former friends. Unfortunately I am housebound and partially crippled by a
stroke so my activity as far as the site is concerned would be limited.  You
mentioned the interest shown by some of the older lads, well at 73 I guess I
qualify! I left Peter Symonds around 1946. I was a rather puny idiot with
ginger hair and a proven candidate for the Remove and Five 2 General.
If anyone remembers me I would be delighted to hear from them. Good luck
with the site and my best wishes to you.
Regards
John
 
Greetings Jim
I do hope you enjoyed your visit to the wild debauchery of the sinful south
coast and feel none the worse for it!
I would be delighted to be posted on the site if you don't think it would
completely mess up the whole thing but it certainly would be interesting to
know if I am remembered by any of the old gang or just a figment of my own
ageing imagination, you could mention that I was also one of the much
despised Eastleigh train boys.
Thanks for your very speedy reply to my earlier effort.
Very kindly yours

John

john lawford, new old boy

Hi everyone,
I occasionally trawl through the Friends Reunited Peter Pips site to see if I can interest anyone in this site.  Just had this from an old boy who may be joining when he can get sorted after a hospital visit.  Maybe there is someone out there who knows him,
 
Dear James
Thanks for the email, I am sorry to be so late in responding but I have just
come home after a short spell in hospital and I am not fully on line at the
moment.
I am very interested in the site and would like to join you and perhaps some
former friends. Unfortunately I am housebound and partially crippled by a
stroke so my activity as far as the site is concerned would be limited.  You
mentioned the interest shown by some of the older lads, well at 73 I guess I
qualify! I left Peter Symonds around 1946. I was a rather puny idiot with
ginger hair and a proven candidate for the Remove and Five 2 General.
If anyone remembers me I would be delighted to hear from them. Good luck
with the site and my best wishes to you.
Regards
John
 
Greetings Jim
I do hope you enjoyed your visit to the wild debauchery of the sinful south
coast and feel none the worse for it!
I would be delighted to be posted on the site if you don't think it would
completely mess up the whole thing but it certainly would be interesting to
know if I am remembered by any of the old gang or just a figment of my own
ageing imagination, you could mention that I was also one of the much
despised Eastleigh train boys.
Thanks for your very speedy reply to my earlier effort.
Very kindly yours

John

Wednesday, 15 May 2002

Recent Class Reunion Report

Well, Wayne Evans, Steve 'Chocky Hen' Collins, Phil Cork and David Singer all stuck to their word and reunited in Winchester on Saturday evening, 11th, May 2002. We were all in Class 3B,4B & 5B (74 to 76) and 3 continued on to sixth form until 78. This event happened as a direct result of this very website. We first e-mailed each other individually and Wayne organised things from there.
 
David came in from Stockholm (visiting family in Southampton), Phil from Oxford, Steve from Easleigh way and Wayne had to trek miles from Winchester.
 
We all appreciated that the gathering was informal and not large for a first one.We first hit a couple of pubs and then enjoyed some excellent Chinese food and some wine later. It all helped to make the chat relaxed and enjoyable. After over 25 years we needed it! We were a bit worried about having little to say to each other before meeting, but found that we all got on rather well. Surprisingly, we had little trouble admitting to our apparent faults, bad fashion sense and our difficulties when at school. We shared stories, updated each other about our jobs, families and home, our current views about education, etc but then time ran out too quickly.
 
We have decided to all meet again in about six months in another location, possibly to watch a game of footie at the Dell and then a pub and restaurant later. A couple of us may even manage to meet before then.
 
If anyone from those days would like to join us (you don't have to come to the match if you hate the sport of course), please do contact me by e-mail.   
 
David Singer

Recent Class Reunion Report

Well, Wayne Evans, Steve 'Chocky Hen' Collins, Phil Cork and David Singer all stuck to their word and reunited in Winchester on Saturday evening, 11th, May 2002. We were all in Class 3B,4B & 5B (74 to 76) and 3 continued on to sixth form until 78. This event happened as a direct result of this very website. We first e-mailed each other individually and Wayne organised things from there.
 
David came in from Stockholm (visiting family in Southampton), Phil from Oxford, Steve from Easleigh way and Wayne had to trek miles from Winchester.
 
We all appreciated that the gathering was informal and not large for a first one.We first hit a couple of pubs and then enjoyed some excellent Chinese food and some wine later. It all helped to make the chat relaxed and enjoyable. After over 25 years we needed it! We were a bit worried about having little to say to each other before meeting, but found that we all got on rather well. Surprisingly, we had little trouble admitting to our apparent faults, bad fashion sense and our difficulties when at school. We shared stories, updated each other about our jobs, families and home, our current views about education, etc but then time ran out too quickly.
 
We have decided to all meet again in about six months in another location, possibly to watch a game of footie at the Dell and then a pub and restaurant later. A couple of us may even manage to meet before then.
 
If anyone from those days would like to join us (you don't have to come to the match if you hate the sport of course), please do contact me by e-mail.   
 
David Singer

Wednesday, 8 May 2002

Doctor Freeman

Who can tell me more about Dr. Freeman? What was Doc. a doctor of? Was it, as I have always supposed it was, Divinity? He wore a clerical collar and his one class as I recall was Divinity.

Every Friday for five years of my life, Doc would, without fail (I was going to say "religiously") appear in the Lecture Room for about a one hour of lecture, but his subject did not even resemble "Divinity". It was closer I would say now, to Darwin’s Theory of Evolution except that he always maintained that there was no continuity between one form and another; that each improved species appeared spontaneously – maybe that was his message.

Despite the fact that I always felt he had tired of talking to the likes of me, I did enjoy it as, with the aid of a beaten-up old epidiascope, he would lead us on an illustrated walk through the Cretaceous, the Devonian, the Oolitic etc. periods. I can see why Hollywood later latched on to the subject of Dinosaurs! He paused occasionally to lament falling standards of education and literacy – "it is not" he would say (reading the label on the photo) "a Scotch Fir Cone, Scotch is a drink and the Fir is unrelated to the Pine", and to tell us about how he once attended a football match and was so overcome by the crowds that he almost fainted. Apparently. the fellow in front of him turned around and said "What’s the matter mate? – you look as white as a bloody sheet!". I remember quite clearly the wry look he had on his face as he told us that one.

Does anyone know any more about our erstwhile headmaster, does any one have any other reminiscences about "Divinity in the Lecture Room" with Doc?

Peter Churchill

 

Doctor Freeman

Who can tell me more about Dr. Freeman? What was Doc. a doctor of? Was it, as I have always supposed it was, Divinity? He wore a clerical collar and his one class as I recall was Divinity.

Every Friday for five years of my life, Doc would, without fail (I was going to say "religiously") appear in the Lecture Room for about a one hour of lecture, but his subject did not even resemble "Divinity". It was closer I would say now, to Darwin’s Theory of Evolution except that he always maintained that there was no continuity between one form and another; that each improved species appeared spontaneously – maybe that was his message.

Despite the fact that I always felt he had tired of talking to the likes of me, I did enjoy it as, with the aid of a beaten-up old epidiascope, he would lead us on an illustrated walk through the Cretaceous, the Devonian, the Oolitic etc. periods. I can see why Hollywood later latched on to the subject of Dinosaurs! He paused occasionally to lament falling standards of education and literacy – "it is not" he would say (reading the label on the photo) "a Scotch Fir Cone, Scotch is a drink and the Fir is unrelated to the Pine", and to tell us about how he once attended a football match and was so overcome by the crowds that he almost fainted. Apparently. the fellow in front of him turned around and said "What’s the matter mate? – you look as white as a bloody sheet!". I remember quite clearly the wry look he had on his face as he told us that one.

Does anyone know any more about our erstwhile headmaster, does any one have any other reminiscences about "Divinity in the Lecture Room" with Doc?

Peter Churchill

 

Monday, 22 April 2002

Try these websites!

I have found dozens of old schoolmates, not only from Peter Symonds, but other schools I have attended, at these two websites: www.friendsreunited.co.uk and www.schoolfriends.co.uk. The first of these is free to register and to read everyone's names and life stories, but they ask for a subscription if you want to read everyone else's email addresses. The "schoolfriends" site is completely free.

Try these websites!

I have found dozens of old schoolmates, not only from Peter Symonds, but other schools I have attended, at these two websites: www.friendsreunited.co.uk and www.schoolfriends.co.uk. The first of these is free to register and to read everyone's names and life stories, but they ask for a subscription if you want to read everyone else's email addresses. The "schoolfriends" site is completely free.

welcome to nigel palmer

I welcomed nigel as a new member and he replied as follows:-

Dear Jim,

Thank you for your welcome .I'm sorry I don't remember you either. I only remember a few people- Reynolds and Rickman who were classics .They were smart -went to Oxford  and I expect did well. Also BRD Stone-chemistry and of course-Paddy Hine. He beat me in the tennis singles finals in 1951.I met him a few years later at an RAF base.He was a flight instructer and I was in the RAFVR. The next time Isaw him was on TV during the Gulf war-head of the RAF! Of course we're all retired now!    Nigel Palmer

[I remember a Harry Rickman who was with me at Western School primary and figures in the London outing photograph on that site, click here Jim Wishart]

 

welcome to nigel palmer

I welcomed nigel as a new member and he replied as follows:-

Dear Jim,

Thank you for your welcome .I'm sorry I don't remember you either. I only remember a few people- Reynolds and Rickman who were classics .They were smart -went to Oxford  and I expect did well. Also BRD Stone-chemistry and of course-Paddy Hine. He beat me in the tennis singles finals in 1951.I met him a few years later at an RAF base.He was a flight instructer and I was in the RAFVR. The next time Isaw him was on TV during the Gulf war-head of the RAF! Of course we're all retired now!    Nigel Palmer

[I remember a Harry Rickman who was with me at Western School primary and figures in the London outing photograph on that site, click here Jim Wishart]

 

Sunday, 21 April 2002

The tie of the old school

This message has been deleted by the author.

The tie of the old school

This message has been deleted by the author.

Wednesday, 20 March 2002

Girls at the school and other stories

I recently swapped emails with Bob and I thought the message might interest the whole group so here it is with his permission:-
 
Hi, Jim,
 
Thanks for the message. I can't remember how I first came across the list - I think was invited, but couldn't log in because I'd forgotten my Microsoft Passport password.  So many of the flippin' things!
 
My family has quite a long association with Peter Symonds'.  I went there between 64 and 70 and my brother, Ian, was part of what I think was the last full intake in 71.  More controversially, my mother attended between 45 and 48 when Doc Freeman was Head, Priestland taught chemistry, Tanner taught physics and Pongo Cox taught biology.  Pongo was still teaching when I was in the 6th, and lived across the road from us in St Cross.  My grandfather was a governor for many years, and also served on the Education Authority.  When he died, a memorial service was held in the Cathedral and it was a bit of a kick to be welcomed by the Headsmaster ('Jake' Ashurst) and ushered to my seat by the head boy.
 
Yes, I enjoy browsing the messages.  Some things bring back memories.  I remember being taught by Mike Batt's mum for a short while.  I also remember him breaking a wrist, I think it was, at sports day.  A year or two later and again at sports day, he caused quite a commotion, turning up in a flash car with a flash suit and a flash girl (or two)!
 
I never thought I'd want to remember those days!
 
Regards,
Robert (Bob) Crocker
 
A postscript:
 
Mum came to Peter Symonds' to study science because she wanted to be a doctor - not very fashionable for women in those days - and St. Swithuns didn't offer the science.  Obviously Grandfather was able to pull some strings, which helped.  Many years later, Mother and Father attended the meeting for parents of prospective pupils when I was due to join.  During Mr. Ashurst's address, he assured parents that 'Peter Symonds' is a boys school. Always was a boys school, always will be a boys school' (which was disproved in Mr. Ashurst's own reign, as there were two or three girls in the sixth form during my time).  This assertion caused a little amusement on the platform behind him, because at least two masters (Pongo Cox and Tom Pierce) were teaching at the school when Mother was there, and one or two more were pupils at the time.
 

Girls at the school and other stories

I recently swapped emails with Bob and I thought the message might interest the whole group so here it is with his permission:-
 
Hi, Jim,
 
Thanks for the message. I can't remember how I first came across the list - I think was invited, but couldn't log in because I'd forgotten my Microsoft Passport password.  So many of the flippin' things!
 
My family has quite a long association with Peter Symonds'.  I went there between 64 and 70 and my brother, Ian, was part of what I think was the last full intake in 71.  More controversially, my mother attended between 45 and 48 when Doc Freeman was Head, Priestland taught chemistry, Tanner taught physics and Pongo Cox taught biology.  Pongo was still teaching when I was in the 6th, and lived across the road from us in St Cross.  My grandfather was a governor for many years, and also served on the Education Authority.  When he died, a memorial service was held in the Cathedral and it was a bit of a kick to be welcomed by the Headsmaster ('Jake' Ashurst) and ushered to my seat by the head boy.
 
Yes, I enjoy browsing the messages.  Some things bring back memories.  I remember being taught by Mike Batt's mum for a short while.  I also remember him breaking a wrist, I think it was, at sports day.  A year or two later and again at sports day, he caused quite a commotion, turning up in a flash car with a flash suit and a flash girl (or two)!
 
I never thought I'd want to remember those days!
 
Regards,
Robert (Bob) Crocker
 
A postscript:
 
Mum came to Peter Symonds' to study science because she wanted to be a doctor - not very fashionable for women in those days - and St. Swithuns didn't offer the science.  Obviously Grandfather was able to pull some strings, which helped.  Many years later, Mother and Father attended the meeting for parents of prospective pupils when I was due to join.  During Mr. Ashurst's address, he assured parents that 'Peter Symonds' is a boys school. Always was a boys school, always will be a boys school' (which was disproved in Mr. Ashurst's own reign, as there were two or three girls in the sixth form during my time).  This assertion caused a little amusement on the platform behind him, because at least two masters (Pongo Cox and Tom Pierce) were teaching at the school when Mother was there, and one or two more were pupils at the time.
 

Sunday, 10 March 2002

3-Tonner / Farleigh Mount Field Days

Read Steve Drake's posting re school holidays and was reminded of other trips out in the 3-tonner.  Mostly CCF field days to Farleigh Mount (haven't been there for years!), but also further afield on occasions.  The worst of the thing was that, if the flap in the front of the canopy was open, Hetty or Pete (or whoever else was in the cab) could see you so you couldn't get away with having a smoke.  However, if you closed the flap, the back filled with exhaust fumes and you couldn't smoke for coughing anyway!
 
On the subject of field days to Farleigh Mount, I recall that we were issued with 5 (or maybe 10) rounds of blank .303 ammo and were told we had to capture a 'machine gun emplacement'.  Those unlucky enough to man the machine gun were issued with twice as many rounds as the rest of us.  On the command, the attackers proceeded to move towards the target using whatever variation of crawl you could do whilst remaining reasonably clean - though some were less fussy about this than others.  During this process, the heads of a number of unfortunate daisies would be blown to pieces.  Eventually, the exercise would be called to a conclusion (not, usually, because the target had been captured, more that the supervising officer was bored to tears) and then we would be marched back to school.  If we arrived early enough, rifle cleaning was then the drill.  Can anyone tell me, was Peter Symonds' solely responsible for the extinction of the Farleigh Mount daisy population, or did they recover?
 
Any other memories of Field Days?

3-Tonner / Farleigh Mount Field Days

Read Steve Drake's posting re school holidays and was reminded of other trips out in the 3-tonner.  Mostly CCF field days to Farleigh Mount (haven't been there for years!), but also further afield on occasions.  The worst of the thing was that, if the flap in the front of the canopy was open, Hetty or Pete (or whoever else was in the cab) could see you so you couldn't get away with having a smoke.  However, if you closed the flap, the back filled with exhaust fumes and you couldn't smoke for coughing anyway!
 
On the subject of field days to Farleigh Mount, I recall that we were issued with 5 (or maybe 10) rounds of blank .303 ammo and were told we had to capture a 'machine gun emplacement'.  Those unlucky enough to man the machine gun were issued with twice as many rounds as the rest of us.  On the command, the attackers proceeded to move towards the target using whatever variation of crawl you could do whilst remaining reasonably clean - though some were less fussy about this than others.  During this process, the heads of a number of unfortunate daisies would be blown to pieces.  Eventually, the exercise would be called to a conclusion (not, usually, because the target had been captured, more that the supervising officer was bored to tears) and then we would be marched back to school.  If we arrived early enough, rifle cleaning was then the drill.  Can anyone tell me, was Peter Symonds' solely responsible for the extinction of the Farleigh Mount daisy population, or did they recover?
 
Any other memories of Field Days?

Thursday, 7 March 2002

the site is now searchable

hi,
I am surprised but I have managed to provide a search engine for the site. It is at the bottom of the Welcome page.  Tell me how you get on with it.
jim wishart

the site is now searchable

hi,
I am surprised but I have managed to provide a search engine for the site. It is at the bottom of the Welcome page.  Tell me how you get on with it.
jim wishart

Friday, 1 March 2002

amending photo descriptions

hi,
I have amended the settings to the photo albums so that members can alter the title or description of any photos.  For example you can add a note to the effect that you feature in the photo which should be more direct than adding a message to the board.
You can also delete the photos but lets hope that nobody feels inclined to do that!
regards,
jim wishart  

amending photo descriptions

hi,
I have amended the settings to the photo albums so that members can alter the title or description of any photos.  For example you can add a note to the effect that you feature in the photo which should be more direct than adding a message to the board.
You can also delete the photos but lets hope that nobody feels inclined to do that!
regards,
jim wishart  

Thursday, 28 February 2002

School Holidays

Does anyone remember going on any holidays from PS? I went on 2, one to the Norfolk Broads and another to the Rhine Valley. Both in the late 60's. We had the inevitable falling overboard in Norfolk, which also saw one of the rowing boats, which were towed behind the cruisers, crushed between cruiser and riverbank. I also seem to remember an exploding tinned pudding - very spectacular in a small galley. Travel to the Broads was by the old army 3 tonner, the floor of which was covered in mattresses. More than one passenger could be seen hanging out the tail gate suffering the effects of travel sickness!
On the German trip we managed one drink in the hotel bar, before being caught and forced to find another establishment. The trip back was on what must have been the oldest boat available and the deck was a patchwork of colours made by the different school uniforms - it must have been a school special. There was also a large amount of sea sickness as it was a pretty rough crossing.

School Holidays

Does anyone remember going on any holidays from PS? I went on 2, one to the Norfolk Broads and another to the Rhine Valley. Both in the late 60's. We had the inevitable falling overboard in Norfolk, which also saw one of the rowing boats, which were towed behind the cruisers, crushed between cruiser and riverbank. I also seem to remember an exploding tinned pudding - very spectacular in a small galley. Travel to the Broads was by the old army 3 tonner, the floor of which was covered in mattresses. More than one passenger could be seen hanging out the tail gate suffering the effects of travel sickness!
On the German trip we managed one drink in the hotel bar, before being caught and forced to find another establishment. The trip back was on what must have been the oldest boat available and the deck was a patchwork of colours made by the different school uniforms - it must have been a school special. There was also a large amount of sea sickness as it was a pretty rough crossing.

Wednesday, 27 February 2002

search engine for the site

people are having difficulty finding things on the site, I'll have to see if I can paste in the search engine that I have found.  Just hope that it doesn't wreck the joint.
jim

search engine for the site

people are having difficulty finding things on the site, I'll have to see if I can paste in the search engine that I have found.  Just hope that it doesn't wreck the joint.
jim

Monday, 25 February 2002

School Musical Production

Does anybody else remember the musical we did in about '52 or 53?  It was about a court case and involved a policeman called, would you believe? Bloggs, plus members of the Jury and other policemen. I think Mr Watts produced it.  I was a policeman and I think we went to the prison to collect our uniforms, truncheons etc.  The show contained such musical gems as "Turn your face to the West Bloggs" and "When you're feeling cross or spiteful"  I could sing them for you - if only we had sound. On second thoughts perhaps it's as well that we don't!
 
John Rowe 

School Musical Production

Does anybody else remember the musical we did in about '52 or 53?  It was about a court case and involved a policeman called, would you believe? Bloggs, plus members of the Jury and other policemen. I think Mr Watts produced it.  I was a policeman and I think we went to the prison to collect our uniforms, truncheons etc.  The show contained such musical gems as "Turn your face to the West Bloggs" and "When you're feeling cross or spiteful"  I could sing them for you - if only we had sound. On second thoughts perhaps it's as well that we don't!
 
John Rowe 

nicknames

Hello,
One of our members has suggested that it is quite difficult to search for old school friends on our site because we use nicknames which may not be known by the searcher.  I think that the problem comes about because of the way that Microsoft set out the join-up page.  American practice is different to English in that their 'nickname' means the name that you are normally known by [I think] whereas in the UK it means a very informal or made up name.
I don't know what you all think but if you like you can alter your 'nickname' quite easily by visiting 'members tools' and amending it.
I think it is a good idea but there is no problem if you don't want to change.
regards,
jim wishart, list manager 

nicknames

Hello,
One of our members has suggested that it is quite difficult to search for old school friends on our site because we use nicknames which may not be known by the searcher.  I think that the problem comes about because of the way that Microsoft set out the join-up page.  American practice is different to English in that their 'nickname' means the name that you are normally known by [I think] whereas in the UK it means a very informal or made up name.
I don't know what you all think but if you like you can alter your 'nickname' quite easily by visiting 'members tools' and amending it.
I think it is a good idea but there is no problem if you don't want to change.
regards,
jim wishart, list manager 

Wednesday, 20 February 2002

the old City Museum,

hello,
this is slightly off topic I know but,
does anyone remember the old Museum in Market Street, next to the Cathedral Grounds before it was 'improved'.
We used to pop in on the way back from Saturday morning pictures to wonder at the stuffed animals, birds fish and, and,.........
I remember the puffer fish and an alligator.
There was always a crowd in there, mostly children.
And then it changed.................
and not for the better in my estimation,
regards,
jim wishart  

the old City Museum,

hello,
this is slightly off topic I know but,
does anyone remember the old Museum in Market Street, next to the Cathedral Grounds before it was 'improved'.
We used to pop in on the way back from Saturday morning pictures to wonder at the stuffed animals, birds fish and, and,.........
I remember the puffer fish and an alligator.
There was always a crowd in there, mostly children.
And then it changed.................
and not for the better in my estimation,
regards,
jim wishart  

Thursday, 14 February 2002

I'm off for a while

Hello all,
I am going to take a few days off, travelling to see family on the south coast.  Now behave yourselves and be kind to each other!!
jim wishart,
list manager 

I'm off for a while

Hello all,
I am going to take a few days off, travelling to see family on the south coast.  Now behave yourselves and be kind to each other!!
jim wishart,
list manager 

Re school photo posted by Bubble on 11/02/2002

Hi Bubble
 
The year of your photo is probably 1952 right?
 
I have identified the following, numbering from the left:-
 
Back Row
 
1.? 2.Hardy 3.? 4.? 5.Metcalfe? 6.? 7.? 8.? 9.Korvin 10.Hazell 11.Greaves
 
Middle Row
 
1.Maddrell 2.? 3.? 4.? 5.CANY 6.DOC 7.TOM 8.? 9.? 10.? 11.Harper
 
Front Row
 
1.? 2.Collins 3.? 4.? 5.Wride 6.Moody 7.Stoneham 8.Hatcher 9.?
 
I wonder where Warder was that day?
 
Is there anyone out there who can fill in the gaps
 
Peter Churchill

Re school photo posted by Bubble on 11/02/2002

Hi Bubble
 
The year of your photo is probably 1952 right?
 
I have identified the following, numbering from the left:-
 
Back Row
 
1.? 2.Hardy 3.? 4.? 5.Metcalfe? 6.? 7.? 8.? 9.Korvin 10.Hazell 11.Greaves
 
Middle Row
 
1.Maddrell 2.? 3.? 4.? 5.CANY 6.DOC 7.TOM 8.? 9.? 10.? 11.Harper
 
Front Row
 
1.? 2.Collins 3.? 4.? 5.Wride 6.Moody 7.Stoneham 8.Hatcher 9.?
 
I wonder where Warder was that day?
 
Is there anyone out there who can fill in the gaps
 
Peter Churchill

76 Leavers Reunion, Spring 2002

Following a recent fascinating and often hilarious e-mail exchange between Wayne Evans and David Singer, the idea of getting together one evening in Spring in Winchester has been suggested. Martin Leigh and Steve 'Chocky Hen' Collins are up for a beer too.
 
Anyone else interested?  Go on, face your past! It could be fun!
 
Please confirm interest and we will take the next step.

76 Leavers Reunion, Spring 2002

Following a recent fascinating and often hilarious e-mail exchange between Wayne Evans and David Singer, the idea of getting together one evening in Spring in Winchester has been suggested. Martin Leigh and Steve 'Chocky Hen' Collins are up for a beer too.
 
Anyone else interested?  Go on, face your past! It could be fun!
 
Please confirm interest and we will take the next step.

Thursday, 31 January 2002

Repertory Company visit

Does anybody remember the performance in the hall by a visiting repertory company, probably 1952?

Repertory Company visit

Does anybody remember the performance in the hall by a visiting repertory company, probably 1952?

Repertory Company visit.

This message has been deleted by the author.

Repertory Company visit.

This message has been deleted by the author.

Monday, 28 January 2002

Teachers

Does anyone remember Penguin, or Mr Hair?

Teachers

Does anyone remember Penguin, or Mr Hair?

Saturday, 26 January 2002

1962 photo

Bloody computors! Beech is ; Centre photo, 3 rows back 2nd. from right. Next to Farrell?
Hells bells, it's a long time. Forget names or faces or both.

1962 photo

Bloody computors! Beech is ; Centre photo, 3 rows back 2nd. from right. Next to Farrell?
Hells bells, it's a long time. Forget names or faces or both.