Saturday, 29 September 2001

army cadet band

posted by Brian Ward,

Army Cadet Band

I was in the Peter Symonds’ army cadets. Then for some unknown reason as I had no musical ability whatsoever I joined the cadet band as a bugler .I think I must have fancied myself as a bandsman and thought that even I could learn to play a simple instrument like the bugle, how wrong I was.

We were encouraged to take our instruments home ,keep polished and practise. The polishing was no problem my bugle was a rather old & battered thing,some of the boys had brand new ones which I always envied ,but I could certainly get mine to shine. Practising was another thing, I can’t imagine why but the neighbours, all the local dogs and even my mother appeared to strongly dislike it, so very little if any practise was accomplished.

I think realisation that I was never going to master the thing came one day when it was raining & we were practising as a band in what was then called the ‘Fives ‘courts. Due to the confined space and echo effect I thought we sounded great(a bit like singing the bath)and that I was at last playing well, it was only when we stopped for a break that the boy in front of me turned round and said could I play something other than just one note or words to that effect. I was quite deflated for a bit but quickly enjoyed a roll of making up numbers and just going through the motions of playing.

A lot of the boys unlike myself had a lot of talent and in fact do not think we were a bad band, unable to remember any names or even faces which is a shame. I am sure there is a photo somewhere but if I will ever find it is doubtful.

If anyone has any memories of this band would be very interested to hear.

Brian Ward

1945-1949

army cadet band

posted by Brian Ward,

Army Cadet Band

I was in the Peter Symonds’ army cadets. Then for some unknown reason as I had no musical ability whatsoever I joined the cadet band as a bugler .I think I must have fancied myself as a bandsman and thought that even I could learn to play a simple instrument like the bugle, how wrong I was.

We were encouraged to take our instruments home ,keep polished and practise. The polishing was no problem my bugle was a rather old & battered thing,some of the boys had brand new ones which I always envied ,but I could certainly get mine to shine. Practising was another thing, I can’t imagine why but the neighbours, all the local dogs and even my mother appeared to strongly dislike it, so very little if any practise was accomplished.

I think realisation that I was never going to master the thing came one day when it was raining & we were practising as a band in what was then called the ‘Fives ‘courts. Due to the confined space and echo effect I thought we sounded great(a bit like singing the bath)and that I was at last playing well, it was only when we stopped for a break that the boy in front of me turned round and said could I play something other than just one note or words to that effect. I was quite deflated for a bit but quickly enjoyed a roll of making up numbers and just going through the motions of playing.

A lot of the boys unlike myself had a lot of talent and in fact do not think we were a bad band, unable to remember any names or even faces which is a shame. I am sure there is a photo somewhere but if I will ever find it is doubtful.

If anyone has any memories of this band would be very interested to hear.

Brian Ward

1945-1949

Tuesday, 25 September 2001

Barton Seagrave, Kelso House 1975 - 1981

Anyone there during this period. Remembers 'Bag' Apple, Rabbits teeth Gregory, Biffer, Brick. Get in touch.

Barton Seagrave, Kelso House 1975 - 1981

Anyone there during this period. Remembers 'Bag' Apple, Rabbits teeth Gregory, Biffer, Brick. Get in touch.

Monday, 17 September 2001

Memories of 1974

It is all a blurr now, but I remember the whole of Wyke Lodge getting suspended, after spending the night out in town. We came back only to be discovered by the house mistress, as we all tried to dart in any open window.
I seem to remember a chap by the name of Townsend getting blamed for almost anything.
I remember fagging, then moving up hoping that someone was going to do my shoes, but they banned it that year. I remeber when the Housemistress was moving out, and an art collector was upset at the fact that we were storing our dirty soccor boots in a very rare victorian albert closet... ah but it all a wonderful blurr

Memories of 1974

It is all a blurr now, but I remember the whole of Wyke Lodge getting suspended, after spending the night out in town. We came back only to be discovered by the house mistress, as we all tried to dart in any open window.
I seem to remember a chap by the name of Townsend getting blamed for almost anything.
I remember fagging, then moving up hoping that someone was going to do my shoes, but they banned it that year. I remeber when the Housemistress was moving out, and an art collector was upset at the fact that we were storing our dirty soccor boots in a very rare victorian albert closet... ah but it all a wonderful blurr

school "houses"

Hi Jim
 
Nobody has yet mentioned the school "houses" into which we were allocated to provide a kind of sports league table.   I think there were 4 - Symonds (exclusively for boarders; Northbrook; Kirby; and Mackenzie - of which I was a member and which always came bottom, while Symonds always came top).   I think there were inter-house competitions in soccer; cricket and athletics; possibly also in swimming.   The top-house cup was for overall performance in all the relevant sports.   There was also a "Victor Ludorum" cup for the best individual boy's performance at the school athletics meeting held every summer term on the outer field. 
 
Regards
 
Peter Smith

school "houses"

Hi Jim
 
Nobody has yet mentioned the school "houses" into which we were allocated to provide a kind of sports league table.   I think there were 4 - Symonds (exclusively for boarders; Northbrook; Kirby; and Mackenzie - of which I was a member and which always came bottom, while Symonds always came top).   I think there were inter-house competitions in soccer; cricket and athletics; possibly also in swimming.   The top-house cup was for overall performance in all the relevant sports.   There was also a "Victor Ludorum" cup for the best individual boy's performance at the school athletics meeting held every summer term on the outer field. 
 
Regards
 
Peter Smith

Sunday, 16 September 2001

1976 Leavers

Are there any leavers from 1976 out there?  I'm Neil Verran and would like to hear from anyone who can remember that far back!

1976 Leavers

Are there any leavers from 1976 out there?  I'm Neil Verran and would like to hear from anyone who can remember that far back!

Sunday, 9 September 2001

web page gone awry

hi members of the list,
it is saturday 8th September, and the welcome page seems to be corrupted, I hope that it cures itself, if not I'll have to redo it,
regards,
jim wishart, list manager,

web page gone awry

hi members of the list,
it is saturday 8th September, and the welcome page seems to be corrupted, I hope that it cures itself, if not I'll have to redo it,
regards,
jim wishart, list manager,

Friday, 7 September 2001

english homework with a difference

Hi Jim
 
Do you remember the "alternative" english homework set by Mr Priestland from time to time, in the form of "50 Up", "60 Up or even "100 Up" questions.   Up to 100 general knowledge questions, with instructions to find the answers by asking parents, relatives, friends or looking up in libraries, encyclopaedias etc.  So much better and more interesting than learning lengthy, uninspiring Shakespearean speeches by heart, or analyzing grammatically some rather dry and obscure sentences.   Here were instead some nice, gentle brainteasers,  of relevance to the real world, and although we did not know it then, very good practice for all those yet to come radio and tv quizzes; pub quizzes; Trivial Pursuit-type games etc.   Mr Priestland was perhaps a generation too soon and missed out on a possible career as a game-show host on TV, or at least as a question setter!   Certainly now much more financially rewarding than being a school teacher.
 
Regards
 
Peter 

english homework with a difference

Hi Jim
 
Do you remember the "alternative" english homework set by Mr Priestland from time to time, in the form of "50 Up", "60 Up or even "100 Up" questions.   Up to 100 general knowledge questions, with instructions to find the answers by asking parents, relatives, friends or looking up in libraries, encyclopaedias etc.  So much better and more interesting than learning lengthy, uninspiring Shakespearean speeches by heart, or analyzing grammatically some rather dry and obscure sentences.   Here were instead some nice, gentle brainteasers,  of relevance to the real world, and although we did not know it then, very good practice for all those yet to come radio and tv quizzes; pub quizzes; Trivial Pursuit-type games etc.   Mr Priestland was perhaps a generation too soon and missed out on a possible career as a game-show host on TV, or at least as a question setter!   Certainly now much more financially rewarding than being a school teacher.
 
Regards
 
Peter 

Wednesday, 5 September 2001

the prison

Winchester Prison stands on the horizon when viewed from the school. Does anyone remember the gruesome significance it seemed to take on when there was to be an execution and how we watched the clock as the time drew near?
 
jim wishart, list manager,

the prison

Winchester Prison stands on the horizon when viewed from the school. Does anyone remember the gruesome significance it seemed to take on when there was to be an execution and how we watched the clock as the time drew near?
 
jim wishart, list manager,